Thursday's Show

Photo by Karl Hugh. Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

Henry V

Thursday, we’re live at the Utah Shakespeare Festival with a look at the bard’s great history Henry V. Director Brian Vaughn says the play represents a battle of conscience. Through two earlier works, Shakespeare’s audience knows Prince Hal as a wild and irresponsible young man. But now he has the crown, and must weigh right and wrong to grow into the role of king. We’ll talk about the character, how he’s been portrayed over time, and what the play has to say about leadership and authority.
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The Hour of Land

15 hours ago
From <a href="http://ansleywest.com/">Ansley West Rivers</a>' photo series "Lunar Traces"

 

Wednesday, writer and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams joins Doug to discuss her latest book, The Hour of Land. It’s a paean to America’s natural parks. The parks are, Williams says, fundamental to our national identity, despite our complicated relationship with them. To mark the centennial of the National Parks Service, Williams visited 12 national parks. She wanted to better understand their relevance in the 21st century. She also wondered if they might serve to help unite our fractured country. [Rebroadcast]

Sanofi Pasteur (changes made) via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/rm35f8, https://goo.gl/cefU8

New York Times reporter Donald McNeil’s new book begins with a mysterious illness that broke out in Brazil in March 2015. The rash and flu-like symptoms were temporary and few were hospitalized. When the Zika virus was pinned as the culprit, Brazil’s health minister brushed it aside as “a benign disease.” Then, nine months later, the babies arrived. Babies with tiny heads. McNeil’s new book tells the story of Zika and he joins us Thursday to assess the very real threat posed by the emerging epidemic.

KUER News

When Governor Gary Herbert appointed Spencer Cox as Utah’s Lieutenant Governor in 2013, his communications team suggested that Cox edit his bio. They wanted him to take out the part about being in a rock band. But Spencer Cox says that’s what’s wrong with politicians. They’re so worried about re-election, they’re afraid to say “I play the bass.” Monday, Cox joins Doug to talk about unconventional political choices, his 100-mile commute, and why he’s still rockin’ bass lines with his band UpSide.

A Clockwork Orange

Aug 19, 2016

Author Anthony Burgess said his novella A Clockwork Orange should have been forgotten, but because of Stanley Kubrick's film, it seemed destined to live on. It's the story of the barbaric passions of a British teen and the state's attempt to impose a mechanistic morality over his free-will. This weekend, The Salt Lake Film Society is screening the film, so Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with the scholar Andrew Biswell. He joined us to explain why Burgess said the point of the book has been widely misunderstood. (Rebroadcast)

On Trails

Aug 18, 2016
Rich via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/uk4xos, https://goo.gl/xYWc9B

In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us Thursday to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike.

The history of Salt Lake City quintet Quiet Oaks is anything but quiet. Four of the band mates played together in a group that broke up after a falling-out with a frontman. Rather than call it quits, they decided to rebuild as Quiet Oaks, refining their take on classic rock into the sound they’ve always aspired to. Now on the western leg of a 42-show tour across America, Quiet Oaks joins us Wednesday to discuss their music and picking up the pieces to become the band they’ve always wanted.

The LDS Church ended the practice of polygamy more than a century ago, but author and activist Carol Lynn Pearson says the idea is “alive and unwell” in Mormon theology. According to doctrine, a man can still be spiritually sealed to multiple wives and those plural marriages are a reality in heaven. Pearson has gathered stories from more than 8000 faithful and former LDS Church members, and joins Doug Tuesday to explain why she says polygamy is still haunting Mormons today.

Monday, we continue our Through the Lens series with a thrilling exploration of the power of protest and the efforts to contain it. Filmmaker Nanfu Wang will join us to talk about her documentary film Hooligan Sparrow, which follows the efforts of activist Ye Haiyan as she and fellow protestors work to shed light on sexual exploitation in China. They’re marked as enemies of the state and routinely harassed by thugs, and the web of trouble also threatens Wang’s film, not to mention her personal safety.

Labor of Love

Aug 12, 2016
Keoni Cabral (cropped, resized) via CC/Flickr, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, https://goo.gl/OkKnN2

From Match.com to Tinder, there are all kinds of ways single people meet each other in today’s tech-driven world. It was a whole lot simpler and, some would say, better just a generation ago – what happened to meeting someone and asking them to dinner? According to scholar Moira Weigel, this is nothing new. As dating has changed throughout American history, people have questioned matchmaking practices. Weigel joins us Friday to explore the transformation of dating. Her book is called Labor of Love.

Vitamania

Aug 11, 2016
Rob via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/18Grio7

To many people, the term “vitamin” is shorthand for “health,” and so the more vitamins we consume, the healthier we’ll be. But what exactly do the 13 dietary chemicals we call vitamins actually do for our bodies? And how much of each vitamin do we need? The journalist Catherine Price went looking for answers to these basic questions. What she learned undermines much of what we thought we knew about nutrition. She joins us Thursday to talk about our quest for better health through nutrition perfection. (Rebroadcast)

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Live Broadcast

RadioWest @ Utah Shakes

Join Doug Fabrizio in Cedar City this Thursday, August 25th and Friday, August 26th as we broadcast live from the Utah Shakespeare Festival.

Calendar of Events

Heard it on RadioWest

RadioWest interviews many guests who have events in and around the state or in cyberspace. Trying to plan your month? Here's your guide to the lectures, screenings and other happenings you've heard on the show.
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VideoWest

Gerda: Downhill From There

Gerda Saunders has progressive dementia. We followed her to her doctor's office, where she had her latest memory evaluation. The results have given her a sense of urgency, and oddly, relief.

Utah Profiles

Utah is full of characters that make our state a vibrant home. Here's a collection of conversations we've had with some of these passionate and thoughtful people.

Local Music Series

There's a young vibrant music scene in Utah. RadioWest brings some of the newest and best bands into the studio to talk about and to play their music live.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

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Listen weekdays at 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1. Join us at 801-585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org