Friday's Show

The Rise of Addictive Technology

Marketing professor Adam Alter begins his new book by noting that Steve Jobs didn’t let his own children use an iPad, a product he invented, because he was worried they’d get addicted to it. That’s what Alter’s book is about: our increasing addiction to technology. These days, we aren’t just hooked on substances, like drugs and alcohol. We’re addicted to video games, social media, porn, email, and lots more. Alter joins us to explore the business and psychology of irresistible technologies. (Rebroadcast)

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Kelsie Moore | KUER

Bishop Oscar Solis has no idea why Pope Francis plucked him from sunny Los Angeles and sent him to lead the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City. Maybe God, he says, has the answer. The first Filipino to lead an American diocese, Solis entered the seminary at 11 years old, speaks four languages, loves golf, and brings abundant humor to his ministries. He joins us Thursday to talk about where his faith in God has led him in life, and to discuss the challenges facing the modern Catholic Church.

Wednesday, we continue our Through the Lens series with a poignant film about the devastating impact economic inequality has had on America’s black working class. Utah-based filmmaker Andrew James’s documentary Street Fighting Men follows the lives of three men in Detroit as they struggle to build something lasting for themselves and future generations. James will join us to tell their stories of fighting to find steady ground in a community wracked by crime, violence, and dwindling opportunity.

American Eclipse

Aug 15, 2017
Étienne Léopold Trouvelot, Public Domain via Wikipedia

With a rare total solar eclipse slated to hit parts of the United States next week, we’re taking the opportunity to talk to science journalist David Baron. In his new book, he tells the story of the 1878 eclipse which had throngs of American scientists racing West to witness and study the celestial phenomenon. Baron is obsessed with eclipses himself, and he joins Doug to talk about how mind-blowing a total solar eclipse can be to both 19th and 21st-century observers.

Devil's Bargain

Aug 14, 2017

To understand Donald Trump’s path to the White House and Hillary Clinton’s downfall, journalist Joshua Green says you have to begin with Steve Bannon. In only a few months, Bannon went from the alt-right powerhouse leading Breitbart News, to the CEO of Trump's campaign, and finally to his current position as White House Chief Strategist. Green joins us Monday to tell Bannon’s story - how a brilliant and charismatic man from the fringe of American politics helped “storm the presidency.”

The First Love Story

Aug 11, 2017
Public domain

Friday, we’re talking about the oldest relationship in the Christian world: Adam and Eve. The writer Bruce Feiler says the two don’t get the credit they deserve, and in his book, he aims to redeem them for a new generation. According to Feiler, the tale of Adam and Eve is a timeless myth that still has much to teach us. They confronted the ultimate human fear—loneliness—and defeated it with the ultimate human expression—love. Feiler joins us to explore the meaning of the first love story. (Rebroadcast)

The "Monkey" Trial

Aug 10, 2017
Smithsonian Institution Archives, siarchives.si.edu

Thursday, we’re telling the story behind the Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925. You know the basics: the agnostic Clarence Darrow and the Bible-thumping William Jennings Bryan faced off in a court room in a battle about teaching evolution in public schools. Our guest is the historian Jeffrey Moran who says the trial came as American culture was shifting and fundamentalists were freaking out about Charles Darwin. It was the trial of the century.

by H. Charles McBarron, Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday, we’re taking a different look at the American Revolutionary War. We think of it as brave patriots fighting for a noble cause, which is true, but in his new book historian Holger Hoock is trying to remind us just how bloody it was. The British brutalized American soldiers; we tortured loyalists. In fact, this cruelty shaped the outcome of the war. Hoock’s book is called Scars of Independence: America’s Violent Birth  and he's joining us to talk about it.

Why Time Flies

Aug 8, 2017

Tuesday, we’re taking a scientific and philosophical look at “time.” If you’ve ever sat through an hour-long meeting that lasted forever, or watched a child grow up in the blink of an eye, you know that time isn’t just a quantifiable measurement. New Yorker science staff writer Alan Burdick says that writing a book about time was actually like “peering into the bottom of existence.” He joins Doug to talk about the clock, our relationship to it, and “Why Time Flies.”

These days, the writer Alexandra Fuller lives in a yurt in Jackson Hole. It’s a far cry from where she grew up: under the cloud of civil war in what was once called Rhodesia in southern Africa. Fuller has chronicled her life in a series of acclaimed memoirs, writing fearlessly about war, family, and the collapse of her decades-long marriage. Her newest book is a novel about two Native American cousins on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. She joins us Monday to talk about her life, her work, and how they overlap.

Overdressed

Aug 4, 2017

Try to imagine 18 tons of clothes. It’s the image journalist and author Elizabeth Cline said surprised her the most while researching her book about the way Americans dress. That’s because that pile represented three-days of donations to one thrift store in one U.S. city. And what’s the impact of the cheap fashion we buy and toss on such a regular basis? Cline is coming to Utah, and Monday she joins Doug to explain what it means for our economy, our environment, and for our culture. (Rebroadcast)

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Through the Lens Free Screening

Street Fighting Men

Join us for a free screening of Utah-based filmmaker Andrew James's documentary STREET FIGHTING MEN. It's a poignant examination of economic inequality's devastating impact on the black working class.

Monday's Show

Public domain

The Life and Legacy of Richard Nixon

“Few came so far, so fast, and so alone,” writes John Farrell in a new biography of President Richard Nixon. Nixon was an idealistic dreamer when he returned from World War II, and he quickly scaled the political ladder. After winning the presidency in 1969, he and his staff pursued progressive reforms and opened relations with China. But Nixon, says Farrell, had another, darker legacy: a divided and polarized America. Farrell joins us Monday to discuss Richard Nixon and the world he made. (Rebroadcast)

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Short Film

Unruly Things

Mushrooms are the perfect symbol for Ardean Watts' philosophy of life … a love of unruly things. Watts died July 21 at the age of 89. We had the chance to go on a walk with him in 2015.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

From the Archive

RadioWest and the Bard

Are you a fan of Shakespeare? We have to confess that we are too. Here's a collection of some of our conversations about the Bard.

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1