Wednesday's Show

Pat Mulroy: The Water Problem

In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.

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Mein Kampf

Mar 6, 2017

Mein Kampf was Adolf Hitler’s autobiographical manifesto, a kind of campaign biography. He wrote the first draft of it while in prison for leading a failed coup, and historian Peter Ross Range says the book crystallized Hitler’s “faith in himself as Germany’s coming redeemer.” Last year, Mein Kampf was republished in Germany for the first time since WWII. Range joins us Monday to talk about the notorious book’s history, influence, and future. (Rebroadcast)

Words on the Move

Mar 3, 2017
Tama Leaver via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/1mhaR6e, http://bit.ly/2gMBl1m

If you’re worried that the word “literally” now means “figuratively,” or if you fret that acronyms are replacing actual words, today’s show will do one of two things: make you pull out your hair, or it’ll change your mind. The linguist John McWhorter says that changes to the English language are nothing new. Language, he says, isn’t some static thing that just is, “it’s actually something always becoming.” McWhorter will join us to discuss how languages evolve and why we should embrace the changes. (Rebroadcast)

Ali Eminov (http://bit.ly/2mGNVR3) CC2.0(http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw)

A coalition of local government officials announced last week that they’d agreed to changes in the plan to address homelessness in the Salt Lake Valley. Previously, four homeless resource centers would be sited in Salt Lake City; now there will be just two, and a site in Sugarhouse won’t be one of them. A hard-closure date was also set for the downtown Road Home shelter. Hopes are high the new plan will work out, but there are skeptics. Doug and his guests are talking about it on Thursday.

From book cover, Open Midnight

Wednesday, our guest is writer and environmental advocate Brooke Williams. Williams spent a year alone verifying maps of the southern Utah desert, where he felt a deep connection to the landscape. He wanted to understand that connection, and found an answer in the imagined story of his ancestor William Williams. Nature and wilderness, he concludes in his new book, are part of his DNA. Brooke Williams joins Doug to talk about listening to the “archaic whisper” of the past, and how saving the land can save us.

Greg Pye via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2mF1RKs) CC2.0 (http://bit.ly/1mhaR6e)

Tuesday, we’re talking about the value of rest. Of taking a break. From everything. For most of us, overwork is the new normal and rest is an afterthought. But the scholar Alex Soojung-Kim Pang says that by dismissing the importance of rest in our lives we stifle our ability to think creatively and truly recharge. Pang will join us to talk about his new book that examines why long walks, afternoon naps, vigorous exercise, and "deep play" stimulate creative work and sustain creative lives.


Kirsten Johnson’s 25-year career as a documentary film cinematographer has taken her around the world, often to regions of conflict. Her own film, Cameraperson, is a memoir of her life’s work assembled from a collage of cutting-room-floor footage. It’s also a keen examination of the dilemmas and blind spots that riddle documentary filmmaking. Johnson joins us Monday as we continue our Through the Lens series on documentary film with an exploration of what it’s like to be behind the camera.

Vszybala via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2fCvqsa

Lions were once feared as the king of jungle. But their influence on the world and in nature now pales in comparison to the diminutive, purring, and demanding house cat. In her book, the journalist Abigail Tucker, investigates the natural and cultural history of house cats. Despite their ubiquity in modern life, she says, we know very little about what cats are, how they came to live among us, and why we love these furry freeloaders. Tucker joins us Friday to talk about the lions in our living rooms. (Rebroadcast)

The Revenge of Analog

Feb 23, 2017
Roco Julie (no changes; http://bit.ly/2lH52E2) (CC BY-SA 2.0, http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw)

A funny thing happened on the way to digital utopia: we rekindled our love affairs with the very analog goods and ideas that tech gurus insisted we no longer needed. What once looked outdated—stuff like paper notebooks, LP records, and board games—is cool again, breathing new life into many businesses that deal in tangible things. The writer David Sax calls this trend the “Revenge of Analog.” In a new book, he explores the real things renaissance, and he’ll join us Thursday to talk about it.

Phillip Massey, KUER

BYU political scientist Jessica Preece says the rallies we’ve seen since President Donald Trump took office aren’t typical for Utah. There’s been the Women’s March, the March for Refugees, and Senator Jason Chaffetz’s town hall was filled to capacity with over 1000 turned away. Wednesday, we’re talking about political action in Utah and we hope to hear from you. Are you getting more involved? How are you making yourself heard? What type of political engagement do you think will make a difference?

Wayne Miller

Tuesday, we’re talking about the life of poet and activist Maya Angelou. A documentary airing on PBS' American Masters tells the story of Angelou’s journey past racism and abuse to become one of our greatest voices. But filmmaker Rita Coburn Whack says she didn’t want this film to be just about what Angelou did in her life, but also about who she was and how she loved. Whack and co-director Bob Hercules join Doug to explain how Maya Angelou’s story gives us a sense of who we all are as Americans. (Rebroadcast)

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Thursday's Show

James Palinsad (http://bit.ly/2mSdcGv) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Should Utah Crack Down on Drunk Driving?

Earlier this month, Utah legislators passed a bill that would give the state the strictest DUI law in the country. The Beehive State was the first to lower the legal blood-alcohol content from .1 to .08, and the new law, if signed by Governor Gary Herbert, would further lower that limit to .05. Supporters say doing so will reduce drunk driving and save lives, while opponents worry that the law will hurt restaurants, bars, and the state’s reputation. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides, and from you.

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