Friday's Show

Cassi Gurell (http://tinyurl.com/gn7zt6c) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://tinyurl.com/p4devpc)

The 2017 Utah Legislative Session in Review

Friday, a panel of journalists and legislators join Doug to review 2017 Utah Legislative Session. A lot has happened on Capitol Hill in the past 45 days. Legislators made a number of changes to the state’s liquor laws, including one that gives Utah the nation’s toughest drunk driving law. Deals were struck to address homelessness in Salt Lake. Tax reforms fizzled. Medical marijuana took a step forward. And car inspections could be a thing of the past. We’ll talk about all that, and more.

Read More

Literary loves, like romantic ones, can be both joyous and painful. The critic Laura Miller was quite young when she met her first love - The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. But the relationship grew troubled when as a skeptical teen she began to learn about CS Lewis' Christian themes. How do you reconcile feelings of literary betrayal when the book was one that shaped who you are? Miller joins Doug to talk about the power of Narnia and the man who created it. (Rebroadcast)

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/a_sorense/3489209778/">Andrew Sorensen</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

The “Star-Spangled Banner” is a song about war and resolve that began life as a drinking tune. We sing it all the time, but often struggle to sing it correctly.  Even professional musicians sometimes butcher our anthem. In a time of uncertainty about national unity, the anthem is one of the few things that can get thousands of Americans to stand up as one.  Guest host Matthew LaPlante looks at the song's complicated history and how it stacks up against other national anthems.

Thursday, We're talking about the life and career of Robert Redford. Biographer Michael Feeney Callan says he became interested in Redford because the actor is more than just a pop icon. As much as he's recognized for his legendary film roles, he is also known for his environmental activism and his impact on filmmaking through The Sundance Institute. But for all that, Redford has remained an enigmatic figure. Callan joins us to talk about the man he came to know in 15 years of writing "Robert Redford." (Rebroadcast)

Tuesday, Doug talks to the scholar Nadja Durbach about the age of the freak show. She's written a book that examines the era when so called "freaks of nature" were marketed and displayed for paying customers - figures like The Elephant Man and Laloo the "Double-Bodied Hindoo Boy." Durbach's interest goes beyond the questions of taste and exploitation. She found that these displays revealed something deeper about body differences and the idea of otherness. (Rebroadcast)

Among the Truthers

Sep 12, 2011

Journalist Jonathan Kay says that a vast conspiracist subculture is spreading like wildfire through North America. Kay spent two years trying to understand the people who adhere to incredible theories on everything from 9/11 and Barack Obama's birth to vaccines. Monday, he joins Doug to explain what he's learned about these "truthers," and why they may be doing real damage to the unity and health of our society. (Rebroadcast)

Endgame

Sep 9, 2011

Friday on RadioWest we're talking about the eccentric chess genius Bobby Fischer. Frank Brady is our guest; he knew Fischer and has written a biography that explores his life. In 1972 at the height of the cold war, Bobby Fischer became the world chess champion by defeating the Soviet Boris Spassky. His success created a phenomenon. He became a superstar. but then he practically disappeared. His life came to be dominated by paranoia and fanatacism. The book is called "Endgame". (Rebroadcast)

Beethoven's Ninth

Sep 8, 2011

This Friday and Saturday, the Utah Symphony will perform an Beethoven Ninth Symphony under the direction of Maestro Thierry Fischer. We're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation on the story behind the most famous piece of classical music in Western culture. Our guest is the Harvard professor Thomas Forrest Kelly - who says that to appreciate the Ninth Symphony, you have to hear it the way audiences did when it was first performed in Vienna, in 1824.  (Rebroadcast)

Packing for Mars

Sep 7, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dotpolka/86705778/">dotpolka</a>/<a href=" http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Popular science writer Mary Roach says that when planning a space mission, everything that's taken for granted on Earth has to be "rethought, relearned and rehearsed." After all, flying a flag with no wind or managing to urinate in zero gravity is no easy feat. Roach's latest book is called "Packing for Mars," and she joins Doug for a look at space exploration and what it teaches us about being human. (Rebroadcast)

Tuesday on RadioWest the historian Will Bagley is with us to talk about his epic quest to chronicle the westward migration of American settlers. Bagley's book tells the story of the Overland Trails that brought more than half a million Americans to the far West of Oregon and California. It's the story of families and fortune hunters and the effect that all of it had the native people who for centuries had already been calling the West home. (Rebroadcast)

Farm City

Sep 5, 2011

Monday, we're talking about urban farming with the writer Novella Carpenter. Carpenter sometimes hears from people that they're moving to the country to farm. She said the problem is you get great food, but you don't have anyone to share it with. Carpenter wanted to farm and stay in her community - a very urban neighborhood in Oakland, California. Novella Carpenter joins Doug to talk about her book "Farm City." (Rebroadcast)

Pages

Monday's Show

Laura Lewis via Flickr/CC, http://bit.ly/2ix26sf

The Science of Fat

Body fat is a source of shame for many people, something to be hidden, fought, and burned away. But fat, says the biochemist Sylvia Tara, isn’t just unsightly blubber, it’s an essential and deeply misunderstood organ that’s vital to our existence. It enables our reproductive organs, strengthens our immune system, protects us from disease, and may even help us live longer. In her book, Tara explores the science behind our least appreciated organ, and she joins us Monday to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)

Read More

Utah Profiles

Utah is full of characters that make our state a vibrant home. Here's a collection of conversations we've had with some of these passionate and thoughtful people.

Connect With Us

Find RadioWest and KUER on your preferred social media platform. Share your own thoughts and find photos, info on upcoming events, behind the scenes details and more.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

VideoWest

Jetty

Join us for an encounter with Robert Smithson's monumental work, his exploration of space, and Smithson's own meditation on Spiral Jetty.

Local Music Series

There's a young vibrant music scene in Utah. RadioWest brings some of the newest and best bands into the studio to talk about and to play their music live.

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1