Thursday's Show

A Conversation with Sandra Cisneros

Thursday, we’re broadcasting our conversation with Latina writer and activist Sandra Cisneros, who was in Utah as a guest of the Tanner Humanities Center. Her 1984 novel The House on Mango Street has become a staple of American literature, but Cisneros says that only the “right kind” of immigrant is welcome in this country. She was born in Chicago, but it’s taken her decades to find home. Cisneros joins us to talk about heritage, identity, and how stories can be a bridge between people.

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Boys of Bonneville

Aug 24, 2011

Wednesday, we're talking about Ab Jenkins, a Utah man who pushed the limits of speed. More than 70 years ago, Jenkins raced his custom-built Duesenberg Special called the "Mormon Meteor" across the Bonneville Salt Flats. Jenkins set 26 records in that car and half of them still stand today. Now, there's a new documentary about Ab Jenkins and the Boys of Bonneville. We'll talk to director Curt Wallin and others about the film and about the newly restored Mormon Meteor.

Lunch Wars

Aug 23, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wlscience/4569761556/">Ben W</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

The average American kid will have some 3,000 school lunches by the twelfth grade. But what are they eating? When filmmaker and author Amy Kalafa went into school cafeterias, she found lunch trays laden with chicken nuggets and French fries, but little in the way of healthy choices. The question she kept hearing from parents though was "What do we do about it?" Kalafa has written a book called "Lunch Wars," and Tuesday, she joins us to explain how to start a school food revolution.

<a href="http://www.rickperry.org/" target="_blank">www.rickperry.org</a>

Texas Governor Rick Perry is shaking up the GOP Presidential race. Within 3 days of entering, a Rasmussen poll already showed him with a double digit lead over Romney and Bachmann. Perry's appealing to the Evangelical Christian vote with a massive prayer rally earlier this month and his vocal skepticism on issues like evolution. Monday, we're talking about Perry's faith and about his relationship to the New Apostolic Reformation - a conservative Christian movement with clear political goals.

Lost in Shangri-La

Aug 19, 2011

Doug talks to Mitchell Zuckoff, author of the book Lost in Shangri-La. In 1945, a site seeing plane of American soldiers crashed in a remote, mysterious valley in Dutch New Guinea. The local tribe was rumored to be head-hunters and had never before been in contact with white people. But the three survivors were caught between the valley and the Japanese enemy. Zuckoff joins us to tell the story of the time they spent with the Dani tribesmen and the daring rescue that brought them home. (Rebroadcast)

Far Between

Aug 18, 2011

Last month, filmmaker Kendall Wilcox made a bold decision. He decided it was the right time for him to admit publically that he is gay. Of course, this process can be difficult for anyone, but Wilcox is an employee of the LDS Church, he teaches at Brigham Young University and he's a producer for BYUTV. Now, he's in the process of making a film that explores the tension between faith and sexual identity. Thursday, Wilcox joins Doug to talk about being "Far Between."

New Music of 2011

Aug 17, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/guidosportaal/4036379423/">Guido S</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

What new music has grabbed your attention this summer? Wednesday, Doug is joined by Bob Boilen, host of NPR's All Songs Considered. Boilen's bringing along his favorite music (so far) of 2011. There are a few names you've heard and a few that might be new to you. There's alternative music, indie rock and some R&B influence. Of course, there's at least a song or two that's just really hard to put into a category.

Rebirth

Aug 16, 2011

We're continuing our documentary film series "Through the Lens" with director and producer Jim Whitaker. Whitaker is the creator of Rebirth, a film that captures a "living history" of September 11. It follows the journey of five people directly affected by the tragedy - a sort of time lapse of their grief, their memories and their path to recovery. Whitaker joins Doug on Tuesday and we'll screen the film Thursday night.

Monday, we're talking about the controversy surrounding Salt Lake City's proposal for a new 2,500 seat theater on Main Street. Proponents say it's another step in the revitalization of downtown and that the venue will serve Utahns with a better selection of Broadway touring shows. The price tag is between $100 and $120 million though and some people are asking what it will mean for other arts organizations in the city.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinkcotton/3913458235/">Janine</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

What do financier Charles Schwab, writer John Irving and actor Orlando Bloom have in common? They all have dyslexia, an oft-misunderstood and chronic condition. Now research into how the brain works is revealing the root causes of reading problems and offering strategies for overcoming them. On Friday, dyslexia expert Dr. Sally Shaywitz joins Jennifer Napier-Pearce for a look into the dyslexic mind.

Area 51

Aug 11, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/hufferstl/3268194987/" target="_blank">Matt Huff</a>/<a href=" http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Doug talks to journalist Annie Jacobsen about the mysterious Area 51. As Jacobsen reports it, you don't really need aliens to make the story of cold war experiments sound very strange. Based on interviews and declassified documents, Jacobsen explores how the government has pushed the boundaries of science with nuclear testing, top secret supersonic jets and other technology still being used today. Don't worry though - there's still a flying disc, a crash landing and bizarre pilots. (Rebroadcast)

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Friday's Show

The Story of Pain

What is pain? You know it when you feel it, but it’s almost impossible to properly describe. And it turns out, our idea of what that suffering is and means has changed significantly over the centuries. Friday, Doug’s guest is British historian Joanna Bourke, who has written a book that investigates “The Story of Pain.” We’ll explore how knowing the history of pain helps us acknowledge our own sorrows and the suffering of others. (Rebroadcast)

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Through the Lens Free Screening

Bending the Arc

Wed, May 3rd, join us for a free documentary screening. It’s the story of people on the front lines of the global health crisis who heal people with impossible afflictions in impossible conditions.

Utah Profiles

Conversations with passionate and thoughtful people that make Utah unique.

Calendar of Events

Heard it on RadioWest

A guide to the lectures, screenings and other happenings you've heard on the show.

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Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1