Friday's Show

Vszybala via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2fCvqsa

The Lion in the Living Room

Lions were once feared as the king of jungle. But their influence on the world and in nature now pales in comparison to the diminutive, purring, and demanding house cat. In her book, the journalist Abigail Tucker, investigates the natural and cultural history of house cats. Despite their ubiquity in modern life, she says, we know very little about what cats are, how they came to live among us, and why we love these furry freeloaders. Tucker joins us Friday to talk about the lions in our living rooms. (Rebroadcast)

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In September 2001, immediately after the terrorist attacks in New York, the United States began a secret war in Afghanistan. Fewer than a hundred Special Forces soldiers infiltrated the country, successfully drove the Taliban from power, and disrupted al-Qaeda. In the new documentary film Legion of Brothers, director Greg Barker tells the stories of these brave men and the harsh lessons of modern war they learned. Barker joins us Wednesday as we continue our coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

Tuesday, we continue our coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival with an examination of the perils and duties of the free press. Director Brian Knappenberger’s documentary film Nobody Speak explores the court battle between online tabloid Gawker and pro wrestler Hulk Hogan as case study, among others, of how big money can use litigation to check the freedom of the press. It also asks what a thin-skinned billionaire in the executive branch could do to media outlets that anger him.

Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by David Peterson

Monday, Doug is joined by filmmaker Laura Dunn, whose new documentary looks at rural America through the eyes of the writer, farmer, and activist Wendell Berry. The film's title comes from Berry’s daughter, who says that as a child her father would challenge her to notice things, to pay attention. He told her to “Look and See.” So that's what Dunn does. She weaves Wendell Berry’s own observations with those of family and neighbors for a deep look at the industrial and economic changes in agrarian life.

Friday morning, KUER brings you NPR special coverage of President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration.

At 7:00 p.m., tune in to RadioWest for a conversation about eloquence. We all know it when we hear it. The skillful delivery of language delights us, captivates us, persuades and moves us. Most importantly, says the linguist David Crystal, speakers and listeners alike enjoy eloquent speech. Crystal has dissected the qualities and practice of eloquence. Partly, he wants to better understand how it's achieved. He also wants to show that eloquence is a talent everyone who uses words can possess. Crystal joins us to examine how the gift of gab works. (Rebroadcast)

Sundance 2017: Trophy

Jan 19, 2017
from film, Trophy

Thursday, we begin our coverage of Sundance with the documentary Trophy. Filmmakers Shaul Shwarz and Christina Clusiau followed hunters, breeders, and conservationists to ask what we do to save the great species of the world from extinction. The high cost of trophy hunting trips to Africa often fund conservation efforts and communities, but critics say there’s a danger in treating animals like commodities. Schwarz and Clusiau join Doug to talk about that relationship between hunting and conservation.

Art and Activism

Jan 18, 2017

Wednesday, the legendary choreographer and dancer Bill T. Jones is among our guests. We recorded a conversation last night at Kingsbury Hall in Salt Lake City. We were also joined by playwright Taylor Mac and director Niegel Smith. It was a conversation about getting an audience to be part of the process. We also talked about the ways artists are often activists, and what it will mean to make art at this transitional moment in American culture.

Biblical Literalism

Jan 17, 2017
Artondra Hall via CC/Flickr, http://goo.gl/qVxgS4, http://goo.gl/sZ7V7x

Retired Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong presents a provocative idea in his latest book. Reading the Bible literally, he says, is heresy. He bases his argument on a close reading of the Gospel of Matthew, which he argues was written by Jews for Jews. Spong says the gospel was not written as a literal account of Christ’s life, but rather as an interpretative portrait of God’s love. Spong joins us to talk about biblical literalism and his uniquely progressive approach to Christianity. (Rebroadcast)

Tim Hetherington, http://www.timhetheringtontrust.org/

The journalist Sebastian Junger has noticed that for many veterans, and even some civilians, war feels better than peace, and he has a theory about why that might be. War, he says, compels us to band together and support one another in pursuit of a clear goal. But under the normal conditions of modern culture, we lose those connections, and we feel lonely and lost. Monday, we're rebroadcasting a conversation with Junger about why we’re stronger when we come together and what tribal societies can teach us about leading meaningful lives. (Rebroadcast)

Friday we’re asking whether the Outdoor Retailer Trade Show would leave Salt Lake City because of the public land agenda of state lawmakers. Peter Metcalf, the founder of the outdoor company Black Diamond, says the trade show should consider leaving if state leaders don’t back off from their attempt to take ownership of public land. But these kinds of warnings have been made before. What’s different this time, and what is the economic value of public land in Utah? Metcalf and others join us.

Kino Lorber | TOWER

On August, 1, 1966, a lone gunman opened fire from the top floor of a tower at the University of Texas at Austin. It was America’s first mass school shooting, and civilians and law enforcement on the ground struggled to respond. When the gunshots were silenced, 16 people lay dead and dozens were wounded. In a new documentary film, director Keith Maitland revisits the events of that infamous day through the words of the people who lived it. Maitland joins us Thursday to talk about his film. It’s called TOWER.

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