Latest Show

The Myth of Persecution

Religion scholar Candida Moss began thinking about Christian martyrs when she heard a sermon comparing the plight of today's believers to that of the early church. But when she started exploring what early Christians really endured, she learned that these stories of victimization had been exaggerated and even invented to inspire the faithful. Wednesday, Moss joins Doug to talk about what she calls the myth of persecution and how those stories continue to create the "us vs them" mindset of today. (Rebroadcast)
Read More

Alpha God

Apr 28, 2015

  For some, God is a violent and fearsome deity. It's an idea used to justify atrocities and oppression committed in His name. The psychologist Hector Garcia says that we have created this God in our own image, and to understand Him, we first have to understand how our own psychology has evolved over eons. Tuesday, Garcia joins Doug to talk about the way humanity's quest for evolutionary success resulted in an "Alpha God" who is more a reflection of us than we are of Him.

  To many readers, Edward Abbey and Wallace Stegner are icons of Western American literature. Both were great writers, and they shared a passion for preserving the West’s unique environment. But, as the nature writer David Gessner explains in a new book, Stegner and Abbey were two very unique men. They differed as much in their writing styles as in their ideas about what it meant to love and care for the land. Gessner joins us Monday to explore how Stegner and Abbey embodied and chronicled the modern West. 

Automation and Us

Apr 23, 2015

If you always use GPS to navigate your destination, do you ever learn where you are? If spell-check keeps you from making mistakes, do you eventually forget how to spell? Nicholas Carr says automation is a fine tool, but we have to be careful about what we concede to computers. Friday, he joins Doug to explain how giving up our decision making means giving up something essential to being human. (Rebroadcast)

  The writer Anthony Doerr’s new novel All the Light We Cannot See tells the tale of a blind French girl in possession of a possibly cursed jewel, a German boy fascinated by radios, and their intersecting fates during World War II. For Doerr, it was a chance to explore the effects of war on children and his research for the book at times haunted him. He joins us Thursday to talk about his highly anticipated novel, his approach to writing, and about the profusion of miracles we encounter every day.

Energy Solutions

  Utah nuclear waste disposal company EnergySolutions hopes to bring 700,000 tons of depleted uranium to a facility in Tooele County. Critics say that while it meets the criteria of Class A waste that EnergySolutions is licensed to store, depleted uranium gets “hotter” over time. The state’s decision is on hold as the company responds to concerns in the recent Safety Evaluation Report. Wednesday, we’re talking about what depleted uranium is and about the science and politics of EnergySolutions' proposal.

Sinsk via CC license, http://bit.ly/1cSixcp

  Nothing embodied the brutality of the Nazi regime more than the concentration camps. Yes, they were hell on earth, but they were very much human creations, as the historian Nikolaus Wachsmann demonstrates in his new book about the camps. Known as the Konzentrationslager, they were first conceived of as penal colonies, then as camps for prisoners of war, and finally as factories. Wachsmann joins us Tuesday to examine the lifespan of the camps, their place in the Third Reich, and what life was like inside them.

Sam Javanrouh via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1Jl54Ux


  The author Neil Gaiman has always wanted to be a writer. As a child, he wanted to be the author of great books, but not just any books: he wanted to be the author of The Lord of the Rings. Those books were already penned, so, as an adult, he wrote his own great works of fable and fantasy, books like Coraline, American Gods, and Sandman. Monday, we're airing a conversation we had with Neil Gaiman over the weekend. We talked with him about his passion for storytelling, about where he gets his ideas, and about beekeeping.

RadioWest Misc.

Apr 17, 2015

  As KUER wraps up its spring fund drive on Friday, we're presenting a selection of clips from RadioWest that illustrate some of the different kinds of shows we like to tackle on a regular basis. We’ve got an interview with controversial Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, a pick from our series featuring local bands, a selection from one of our favorite films at Sundance this year, and a discussion about not-so-distinct dialect of native Utahns. We hope you’ll joins us.

Esteemed painter Randall Lake traveled to Europe to hone his art and it was in France that he discovered Mormonism. He eventually settled in Utah, which has been his home since 1973. Over time, his paintings have reflected Lake's own journey -- from traditional landscapes as a dedicated Mormon to more daring works as an openly gay man. Lake has a new exhibit opening next week in Salt Lake City, so we're rebroadcasting our conversation about his life and art. (Rebroadcast)

Last Days in Vietnam

Apr 15, 2015

In the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, a skeleton crew of U.S. military operatives was all that stood between the vindictive Viet Cong and South Vietnamese allies who had aided American forces. With the clock ticking, a number of heroic Americans took matters into their own hands. They saved as many South Vietnamese lives as they possibly could. It’s a little-known story of honor and tragedy chronicled in filmmaker Rory Kennedy’s latest documentary. She joins us Wednesday to talk about it.

Pages

VideoWest

Unruly Things

For Utah musician and educator Ardean Watts, mushrooms are the perfect symbol for his philosophy of life ... a love of unruly things.

Event

Utah is full of real stories and real characters that make this place unique. And it’s full of filmmakers ready to bring those stories to an audience. Are you one of them?

21st Century Fitness

What does it take to be fit and healthy? We consult the brightest minds to try to cut through the fat and find out.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

Local Music Series

There's a young vibrant music scene in Utah. RadioWest brings some of the newest and best bands into the studio to talk about and to play their music live.

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1. Join us at 801-585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org