Thursday's Show

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The Monastic Life

How did a Trappist monastery flourish in the mountains of Utah for 70 years, and what led to its closing? Thursday, we’re talking about the history of monastic life and how it is expressed today.

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Filmmaker Doug Nichol’s new documentary is a tribute to typewriters. In an age of high-tech, do-it-all gadgetry, the typewriter may be on the edge of extinction, but it still offers artists of all stripes unique access to the creative spirit.

Monday, we're talking about our massive food waste problem. A full forty percent of food in America ends up in the trash. Activist Tristram Stuart joins us to talk about why we waste so much food and what we can and should do about it.

15 years ago Elizabeth Smart was kidnapped by religious fanatic Brian David Mitchell, and a new film tells the story of her months in captivity. Friday, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Smart about the ordeal and faith, family, and survival. (Rebroadcast)

It's All Relative

Nov 9, 2017

You’ve probably got that one family member who just drives you crazy. Maybe it’s their politics or their constant talk about their cat’s eating habits, but you put up with it because their family, right? Well, experimental journalist A.J. Jacobs wants you to think more broadly, because the way he sees it, we’re all cousins. His latest book is a dive into genealogy and the new ways we’re understanding the human family. He’s coming to Utah, and joins us to talk about the world’s family tree.

Blurred Lines

Nov 8, 2017

Wednesday, we’re talking to journalist Vanessa Grigoriadis, whose controversial new book looks at sex and sexual violence on college campuses. Grigoriadis interviewed more than 100 students, as well as parents and college administrators, to try to understand how sex, power, and consent work on campus these days. The answer is really complicated with good and terrible sides to the story. There’s also a lot of what she calls the mushy middle. Her book is called Blurred Lines.

No idea from psychology has saturated popular culture as thoroughly as Hermann Rorschach’s inkblots. Rorschach designed the ten amorphous, symmetrical inkblots as a means to probe the human mind. He believed that what you see is who you are. He died less than a year after publishing his test, and the inkblots became a kind of sorcerer’s apprentice, influencing the world without his guidance.  In a new biography, writer Damion Searls chronicles Rorschach’s life and the influence of his iconic creation.

Jeffrey Jones via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2Ajfk23), CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw)

What do you do when a panhandler approaches you? Do you give money? Do you give food? Maybe you don’t give the person anything. Maybe you donate to a homeless services organization, or volunteer at the soup kitchen instead. But what should you do? That’s what we’re asking on Monday’s show. Our guests work closely with Utah’s homeless population, and they all agree, there are no easy answers when it comes to the ethical questions around panhandling.

Mr. Gaga

Nov 3, 2017

Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin is one of the dance world’s most important figures. He can be demanding and intimidating, but professional dancers have pushed beyond their personal limits to express his unique movement language. It’s called “gaga.” Naharin says it’s about listening to the body before telling it what to do. Director Tomer Heymann joins us to tell the fascinating story of Naharin's life and how his unique artistic vision has influenced modern dance.

International Refugee Assistance Project/Twitter http://bit.ly/2xKuM5y

Becca Heller likes to say that she leads an army. But her soldiers don’t battle with guns. They’re lawyers and law students. They use the law to protect the legal and human rights of refugees seeking shelter and assistance, and their work has never been easy. It only got more difficult with the election of Donald Trump and his efforts to enact a travel ban. Heller is in Utah this week, and she joins us Thursday to talk about America’s immigration policies and the challenges of refugee resettlement.

KUER file photo

The LDS Church may have been founded by an uneducated, 19th century tenant farmer, but historian D. Michael Quinn estimates its 2010 tithing income at $33 billion dollars. And that’s to say nothing of the Church’s investments, business holdings, and “seemingly endless capital.” To understand the Church’s economic history, Quinn says you have to understand God as the ultimate CEO of the Church and its business on earth. He joins us to talk about his new book on Mormon “Wealth and Corporate Power.”

Pages

Films

We’ve been following Gerda Saunders on her journey with dementia. This time, we sat down with her husband Peter to ask what the diagnosis has meant for their life together.

From the Archive

NPR Best Books & RadioWest

NPR is your guide to the best books of 2017, and RadioWest made the list with featured links to three of Doug's great conversations.

Utah Profiles

Conversations with passionate and thoughtful people that make Utah unique.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1