Friday's Show

The Story of Pain

What is pain? You know it when you feel it, but it’s almost impossible to properly describe. And it turns out, our idea of what that suffering is and means has changed significantly over the centuries. Friday, Doug’s guest is British historian Joanna Bourke, who has written a book that investigates “The Story of Pain.” We’ll explore how knowing the history of pain helps us acknowledge our own sorrows and the suffering of others. (Rebroadcast)

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The Long Walk

Mar 30, 2017
GARY DAVID GOLD FOR OPERA SARATOGA

In his memoir, Brian Castner comes right out and tells you he’s crazy. Castner was the leader of a bomb disposal team in Iraq, a gory, dangerous job. But he never considered what life would be like when he got home. So to try to figure out who that crazy person was, he started writing. His 2012 book is the basis for an opera that’s being performed in Salt Lake City. Thursday, Castner and others join us to talk about the costs of war, and how you make art out of an experience like that.

If you see something evil happening, should you be held accountable if you don’t try to stop it? Legal scholar Amos Guiora’s grandparents were murdered in the Holocaust, and a few years ago he set out on a journey to explore how the Nazi atrocities were allowed to happen. He’s now written a book that looks at not only the moral imperative for bystanders, but the legal obligation to act. Wednesday, Guiora joins Doug to explain why he believes not taking action is criminal.

Ken Lund (http://bit.ly/2oayst8) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Students at Brigham Young University are required to follow strict moral guidelines known as the Honor Code. Most students at the school are prepared to meet the code’s rigid demands, but some aren’t, says Darron Smith, a former BYU professor. Smith says that many black and/or non-Mormon athletes may not fully anticipate the challenges of the Honor Code, and he argues that they’re disproportionately punished for violating it. He’ll join us Tuesday to discuss what happens when race, religion and sports collide.

The Zookeeper's Wife

Mar 27, 2017
from "The Zookeeper's Wife," Focus Features

Monday, the acclaimed naturalist and writer Diane Ackerman talks about the story she uncovered of Jan and Antonina Zabinski, a zookeeper and his wife. The couple ran the Warsaw Zoo during the brutal Nazi occupation of World War II, and they were able to save more than 300 people destined to be exterminated by the Nazis. Ackerman’s book has been made into a film, so we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with her about the role of nature in kindness and savagery. (Rebroadcast)

Fire, water, air, and earth – these are the classical elements of cooking. According to food journalist Michael Pollan, they help us transform stuff from the natural world into delicious food and drink.  But increasingly, cooking isn't done in the home; it’s done by corporations and restaurants, and that’s disconnecting us from the very idea of food and how we eat it. Pollan joins us Friday to talk about his book Cooked, and to explore how this trend affects our planet, our culture, our food, and our health. (Rebroadcast)

James Palinsad (http://bit.ly/2mSdcGv) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Earlier this month, Utah legislators passed a bill that would give the state the strictest DUI law in the country. The Beehive State was the first to lower the legal blood-alcohol content from .1 to .08, and the new law, if signed by Governor Gary Herbert, would further lower that limit to .05. Supporters say doing so will reduce drunk driving and save lives, while opponents worry that the law will hurt restaurants, bars, and the state’s reputation. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides.

In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.

Chris Blakeley (http://bit.ly/2n7rWoC) via CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (http://bit.ly/OJZNiI)

English professor Christopher Newfield spends a lot of time thinking about public higher education. He’s worried about it. America’s public college system, he says, is in a shambles, with students paying higher tuitions for less learning. The conventional thinking is that public sector practices are to blame, but Newfield argues that the increasing privatization of our universities is the real problem. He joins us Tuesday to explain how we wrecked public universities and how we can fix them.

Morgan Schmorgan (http://bit.ly/2n76yjB) and Stuart Rankin (http://bit.ly/2mEhOkf) via CC BY-NC 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1jNlqZo) (changes made)

Monday, we’re talking about fake news. You’re hearing that term a lot these days, and it’s being applied to all kinds of media, from articles written by Macedonian teenagers to the work of news outlets like CNN. But what is fake news, and maybe more importantly, what isn’t it? Where does it come from and what effects has it had on our culture? We’ll also talk about the efforts to combat fake news and the challenges of getting people to change their minds about stuff they really want to believe is true.

The Immortal Irishman

Mar 17, 2017

Friday, journalist Timothy Egan joins us to tell the story of Irish revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher. Egan first encountered Meagher as a statue on the Montana Capitol grounds, but tracing his life took Egan from the brutal occupation of Ireland and the famine which killed a million people, to the fields of America’s civil war and to the American frontier. We’ll talk about Meagher’s transformation from romantic to rebel to leader, and what it reveals about the journey. (Rebroadcast)

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Monday's Show

American Heiress

Monday, our guest is author Jeffrey Toobin, who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown. (Rebroadcast)

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Through the Lens Free Screening

Bending the Arc

Wed, May 3rd, join us for a free documentary screening. It’s the story of people on the front lines of the global health crisis who heal people with impossible afflictions in impossible conditions.

Utah Profiles

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A guide to the lectures, screenings and other happenings you've heard on the show.

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Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1