Thursday's Show

2018 Summer Reading

Get ready to jot down some notes, because you're going to hear about a book (or two, or ten) that you'll want to read. Salt Lake booksellers join us with their annual list of recommendations.

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RadioWest | Films

A Mission Isn't For Everyone

Stand-up comedian Aaron Woodall says the audiences at BYU can be easy to please. But not always. What if you could tell a joke that was so good and so funny, it would make someone change their mind?

Wednesday, we're talking about one of the most effective members of President Trump's Cabinet. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt made a name for himself by attacking the agency he now leads. He's also been mired in a growing series of ethical investigations.

Public Domain

Historian Joshua Freeman joins us to talk about the history of factories, which is really interesting when you consider the lives of the people who've worked in them and how they've shaped our world.

Wheeler Copperthwaite via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2szlOWg

Journalist Sam Quinones says to understand the opiate epidemic, you have to look at the cultural baggage underpinning it. Poor people in Mexico are looking for a leg up, and disaffected people in the U.S. just want to check out.

Ghostland

May 4, 2018
The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado is said to be haunted, and inspired Stephen King's novel "The Shining." William Andrus, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2e8rrFw

Friday, we’re taking a haunted tour of America with writer Colin Dickey. We'll talk about why we tell these stories and how they help us make sense of our world.

Woolly

May 3, 2018
Photo by Timothy Nessam, http://bit.ly/2wjjMLQ, CC via Flickr

Believe it or not, scientists are actually trying to bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction. It's not going to be easy, but if they get it right, and if they manage all the legal and ethical hurdles, the results could actually help save the world.

When he started shooting video of his skateboarding friends, Bing Liu figured he was just making another skating video. He ended up with a documentary film about the minefield of masculinity boys face on the road to adulthood.

Could medical marijuana ever be a reality in conservative Utah? Tuesday, we’re talking about the politics, popular opinion, and policies surrounding legalizing cannabis.

Between 1880 and 1940, more than 4,000 African Americas were lynched in the U.S. And Scholar Amy Wood says they were mostly committed in public, with huge crowds celebrating with photos and souvenirs. 

Quackery

Apr 27, 2018
Photo by Wayne S. Grazio, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2DVg7uK

Friday, we’re talking about some of the weirdest ways we’ve tried to cure our bodies and minds through the ages. Doctor and author Lydia Kang is our guide and she says we still need to be saved from quacks.

Radio Hour Episode 12: Stand

Apr 26, 2018

What if the Pledge of Allegiance ended with "liberty and justice for all ... citizens"? Tune in April 26 for our 12th radio drama with Plan-B Theatre Company.

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Friday's Show

IIP Photo Archive, CC via Flickr, https://bit.ly/2H8H2ox

Political Tribes

Legal scholar Amy Chua says tribalism is tearing the U.S. apart, and in order to build unity, we need to understand how identity politics have hijacked the left and the right.

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Race and the Mormon Church

The LDS Church has a complicated history with race. On the 40th anniversary of the lifting of the black priesthood ban, KUER offers this collection of conversations and stories on race and Mormonism.

Utah Profiles

Conversations with passionate and thoughtful people that make Utah unique.

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1