Wednesday's Show

Pat Mulroy: The Water Problem

In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.

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John Sargent (changes made; some rights reserved; CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2kVJsrN) CC (http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw)

In America today, nearly 10% of the population has diabetes; more than two-thirds of us are overweight or obese; and one out of 10 kids are thought to have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The journalist Gary Taubes blames all of these afflictions on one culprit: sugar. In a new book, Taubes argues that sugar is the “principal cause of the chronic diseases most likely to kill us…in the 21st century.” Taubes joins us to make the case against sugar and why we’d be healthier without it.

Downwind

Feb 3, 2017

Friday, we’re talking about the effects of nuclear weapons on people who lived near uranium mines and downwind from testing sites during and after the Cold War. Historian Sarah Alisabeth Fox says that all wars happen where people live, grow their food and raise their children. So to understand what happened, she talked to ranchers, farmers, and housewives who suffered from cancer and economic ruin. Her book is called "Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West.” (Rebroadcast)

Exit polls from November’s election found that 1 in 5 people said Supreme Court appointments were “the most important factor” in casting their Presidential vote. Well, this week President Donald Trump announced his nominee for the Court’s empty seat, and Neil Gorsuch is the potential justice Republicans have been waiting for. Thursday, Doug sits down with University of Utah law professors Amy Wildermuth and RonNell Andersen Jones to talk about what the appointment heralds for the Court.

Wednesday, we continue our Through the Lens series with Fred Peabody’s documentary film All Governments Lie. It’s inspired by the work of I.F. Stone, an investigative journalist and gadfly in the early 1950s to the `70s. Stone’s modern torchbearers—journalists like Matt Taibbi, Glenn Greenwald, Amy Goodman and others profiled in the film—produce their adversarial journalism outside mainstream media. Peabody joins us Wednesday to discuss the value of alternative news and the role of independent journalists.

 

Wherever you turn these days, commercials, sponsored social media, and other advertising efforts await your attention. The influential thinker Tim Wu says we have the “attention merchants” to thank for that. In a new book, Wu argues that the concerted efforts of advertisers to attract our attention at every opportunity has made us more distracted and less focused than ever before. Wu joins us to explore the rise of the attention merchants and the human costs of their efforts. [Rebroadcast]

MormonLeaks

Jan 30, 2017

Monday, we’re exploring MormonLeaks, an online platform where LDS Church employees and insiders can leak private Church documents. Nothing all that incriminating or even interesting has come out yet. The videos and papers have basically shown the LDS Church to be a byzantine bureaucracy run much like a business. But MormonLeaks founder Ryan McKnight says he’s not looking for scandals, just transparency. We’ll talk about the leaks and what they reveal about Mormonism today.

Sundance 2017: 78/52

Jan 26, 2017

Thursday, we're wrapping up our coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival with director Alexandre Phillipe and his documentary film 78/52. The film’s title refers to the 78 setups and 52 cuts that make up one of the most iconic moments in cinematic history: the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s film Psycho. Phillipe’s film is equal parts love letter and textual analysis. It examines the scene’s audacity both in the context of the film and in the broader context of American society on the brink of upheaval.

In September 2001, immediately after the terrorist attacks in New York, the United States began a secret war in Afghanistan. Fewer than a hundred Special Forces soldiers infiltrated the country, successfully drove the Taliban from power, and disrupted al-Qaeda. In the new documentary film Legion of Brothers, director Greg Barker tells the stories of these brave men and the harsh lessons of modern war they learned. Barker joins us Wednesday as we continue our coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

Tuesday, we continue our coverage of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival with an examination of the perils and duties of the free press. Director Brian Knappenberger’s documentary film Nobody Speak explores the court battle between online tabloid Gawker and pro wrestler Hulk Hogan as case study, among others, of how big money can use litigation to check the freedom of the press. It also asks what a thin-skinned billionaire in the executive branch could do to media outlets that anger him.

Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by David Peterson

Monday, Doug is joined by filmmaker Laura Dunn, whose new documentary looks at rural America through the eyes of the writer, farmer, and activist Wendell Berry. The film's title comes from Berry’s daughter, who says that as a child her father would challenge her to notice things, to pay attention. He told her to “Look and See.” So that's what Dunn does. She weaves Wendell Berry’s own observations with those of family and neighbors for a deep look at the industrial and economic changes in agrarian life.

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Thursday's Show

James Palinsad (http://bit.ly/2mSdcGv) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Should Utah Crack Down on Drunk Driving?

Earlier this month, Utah legislators passed a bill that would give the state the strictest DUI law in the country. The Beehive State was the first to lower the legal blood-alcohol content from .1 to .08, and the new law, if signed by Governor Gary Herbert, would further lower that limit to .05. Supporters say doing so will reduce drunk driving and save lives, while opponents worry that the law will hurt restaurants, bars, and the state’s reputation. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides, and from you.

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