Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways To Connect

Bunker Hill

21 hours ago

Friday, Doug is joined by author and historian Nathaniel Philbrick for a grassroots look at the American Revolution. His latest book takes to the streets of Boston during the British occupation of 1775 and follows the merchants, farmers, artisans and sailors – the vigilantes and the sober citizens on their march towards rebellion. The tension climaxed with the Battle of Bunker Hill. It was the bloodiest engagement of the war and the moment, Philbrick says, that set the course for Revolution. (Rebroadcast)

Gwendal Uguen via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1f2IiYL

Witch weighing, African swallows, a bloodthirsty bunny, God himself… We’re talking of course about Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Sure, the movie is epically silly, but behind the humor lay countless cultural and historical references. According to BYU film studies professor Darl Larsen, in crafting their 1975 cult-classic film the Pythons drew from Arthurian legend, the Medieval period, and the hard times of 1970s Great Britain. Larsen joins us Thursday for something completely different.

Wednesday, we continue our Through the Lens series on documentary film with an exposé of the government’s controversial domestic counterterrorism tactics. The filmmakers behind (T)ERROR were on the ground as Saeed Torres, an aging Black revolutionary turned informant, aided the FBI in an active sting operation. Torres is just one of a growing number of covert operatives in America who straddle the murky line between preventing crimes and inciting them. Director David Sutcliffe joins us to talk about his film.

Mark Robinson via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1GLwTU1

The history of the domestic pig is a tale of both love and loathing. We cherish pigs for the delicious meat they supply. But, as an animals that eats and roots in filth, swine are often met with contempt. In a new book of porcine history, the writer Mark Essig follows the humble pig’s journey from Neolithic villages to modern industrial farms. Essig joins us Tuesday to explore the pig’s vast importance, the tragedy of its modern treatment, and its complicated relationship with humanity.  

Jonathan Alcorn, http://jalcornphoto.photoshelter.com

The Supreme Court’s ruling Friday that same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states was met with a mix of jubilation and resentment. Proponents of LGBT rights celebrated a pivotal victory; while others expressed concern that the court’s decision erodes their religious liberty. And yet, both sides agree there’s still significant work to be done. Monday, we examine where the LGBT movement goes from here and ask how the country will seek to balance gay marriage with the challenge of religious freedom.

#CreativeUtah: Paper

Jun 26, 2015

Here's #CreativeUtah challenge no. 4. Take a piece of paper and ... do something with it. You can draw on it, write all over it, stain it, tear it, etc. It may seem like "just a piece of paper," but for Marnie Powers-Torrey of the University of Utah's Book Arts Program, it's much, much more. Doug sat down with her to ask what she loves about paper, and how you can create with it.

Between Earth and Sky

Jun 26, 2015

Whether you are sitting at your desk, in the kitchen, or walking down the street, you’re likely near something that came from a tree. But biologist and world-renowned tree expert Nalini Nadkarni says that our relationship with trees goes much deeper than the resources they provide. From spirituality and recreation to medicine and the arts, trees play many roles in our lives. Friday, Nadkarni joins Doug to discuss what trees can teach us about our place in the world. (Rebroadcast)

Spinster

Jun 25, 2015

Journalist Kate Bolick likes the word spinster, though she wants to redefine it. She says that until recently there have been two stereotypes of unmarried women: fabulous and frivolous or pathetic and desperate. But today, there are more than 100 million American women who are single, and Bolick says it’s a choice to live life on your own terms. Thursday, she joins Doug to talk about her single life, and the lives of 19th and 20th century “spinsters” who emboldened her.

A World Without Work

Jun 24, 2015
Marco Orazi via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1N7sKxq

America has valued the rewards of hard work since its founding. Even so, we’ve long anticipated a future when machines would free us from the toil of labor, and that day may be close at hand. Computer scientists and software engineers are developing technologies that could replace jobs at an exponential rate. And what then? What would our world be like without work? The journalist Derek Thompson investigates that question in a new article for The Atlantic magazine, and he joins us Wednesday to talk about it.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published 150 years ago, and though you may have never read the book, you probably know the story. But what about the stories behind the story? Tuesday, we’re talking about the real lives that led to Alice’s adventures. Just who was Charles Dodgson, also known as Lewis Carroll, the man who wrote the books? And who was Alice Liddell, the young girl who inspired the tales? Oxford lecturer Robert Douglas-Fairhurst will be our guide to the secret history of Wonderland.

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