Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

Legal journalist Elie Mystal says the Supreme Court is our least transparent branch of government and people are very uninformed about it. That’s where WNYC’s Radiolab is stepping in. They’ve created their first spin-off series and it’s focused on the court and what its rulings mean for “we the people.” Mystal is legal editor of More Perfect, and Monday, he and host Jad Abumrad join Doug to talk about getting past the wonkiness and bringing the stories of our highest court to life.

Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division

 

When it set sail from New York on May 1, 1915, the Lusitania bore a full manifest of passengers and the ingenuity and hubris of its era. It was immense and luxurious, the fastest civilian ship in service. It was also under threat. The Germans declared that British ships sailed “at their own risk,” a risk the Lusitania’s operators perilously defied. They claimed theirs was the safest ship at sea. Friday, the writer Erik Larson joins us to recount the disastrous tale of the Lusitania’s last crossing. [Rebroadcast]

Filmmaker Laurie Kahn calls romance fiction a story of pride and prejudice. The genre accounts for a billion dollars in annual sales, and the people who read and write these steamy books are a vast community of educated and savvy women. But despite its wild popularity and economic success, many see romance as nothing more than tawdry, throw-away pulp. Thursday, Kahn and Princeton University’s William Gleason join us to talk about romance’s literary strengths and the people who love the genre.

Carl Safina

Animals have deeply fascinated the writer Carl Safina since he was a little kid, and he’s always wondered what animals do and why they do it. More than anything, Safina wants to know what it’s like inside other animals’ minds and in their day to day lives. To try to find out, he traveled to Yellowstone to observe wolf packs, visited elephants in Africa, tracked orcas in Vancouver, and just hung out with his dog at home. Safina joins us Wednesday to offer his insight into what animals think and feel. [Rebroadcast]

Public Domain https://goo.gl/hpqB96

In 2012, Karen King, a respected scholar at Harvard Divinity School, presented a papyrus fragment bearing text that implied Jesus was married. King staked her reputation on the authenticity of what she called “The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.” Test after test failed to prove the papyrus was a forgery, but the journalist Ariel Sabar still smelled something fishy. He put the fragment through a new test, one that examined its chain of ownership. Sabar joins us Tuesday to share the unbelievable tale he uncovered.

Feminism once had a bad reputation, but these days, it’s the “in” thing. Social media is full of “girl power” messages by celebrities and advertisers. And while those may make for some feel-good messages, the cultural critic Andi Zeisler says they offer little in the way of real change. Women still face inequality and violence in daily life. Monday, Zeisler joins Doug to talk about the way feminism has been bought and sold and what it means for the political movement.

The Immortal Irishman

Jun 17, 2016

Friday, journalist Timothy Egan joins us to tell the story of Irish revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher. Egan first encountered Meagher as a statue on the Montana Capitol grounds, but tracing his life took Egan from the brutal occupation of Ireland and the famine which killed a million people, to the fields of America’s civil war and to the American frontier. We’ll talk about Meagher’s transformation from romantic to rebel to leader, and what it revels about the journey of the Irish people. (Rebroadcast)

Thursday, we’re asking how it is Gov. Gary Herbert ended up in a primary race. He enjoys high voter approval ratings, yet he failed to secure the nomination. Critics say it’s more proof the system is flawed. We start with Utah GOP Chairman James Evans and Count My Vote board member Kirk Jowers to debate the merits of the party’s nomination process. We’ll then turn to scholars Norman Ornstein and Thomas Mann who say the 2016 Presidential election could lead to a major rethinking of the Republican Party.

Noakes Foundation

 

Professor Tim Noakes is one of the most widely respected authorities on exercise and fitness, and he’s built his career by challenging conventional beliefs, including his own. The idea of carb-loading before endurance races: he came up with that. These days he promotes a high-fat low-carb diet, even for athletes. And he’s not a big fan of sports drinks. Noakes joins us Wednesday to talk about eating better, drinking less, and running against the grain to achieve better athletic performance. [Rebroadcast]

L-R, Matthew Brady, U.S. House of Representatives, Library of Congress

  When suffragist Victoria Woodhull set her sights on the White House in 1872, women didn’t have the right to vote. She was the first woman to run for America’s highest office, but of course she wasn’t the last. Tuesday, historian Ellen Fitzpatrick joins us to discuss the presidential bids of Woodhull, Republican Margaret Chase Smith in 1964, and Democrat Shirley Chisholm in 1972. We’ll talk about the opposition they faced and how they paved the way for women like Hillary Clinton today.

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