Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

Monday, we're talking about what happens when the right to privacy comes up against a free press. Director Brian Knappenberger's film uses as a case study the trial over Hulk Hogan's sex tape. With the funding of an internet billionaire, Hogan sued and ruined the online tabloid Gawker. It’s a tawdry story, but the film explores the ways big money can silence the media. It’s called Nobody Speak. (Rebroadcast)

The Seeds of Life

Jun 23, 2017
CC0 Public Domain

It’s a timeless question, asked by every kid that’s ever lived: where do babies come from? It turns out even the great scientific minds of the Enlightenment didn’t really have an answer. While navigators and cartographers seemed to have mastered the heavens and the Earth, other scientists were conducting bizarre experiments to put their finger on how exactly humans create life. Science writer Edward Dolnick joins us to tell the story of 250 years of searching and the meandering ways of scientific discovery.

Thursday, we continue our Through the Lens series on documentary films with an on-the-ground account of the occupation last year of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. For 41 days, protestors and right-wing militia members, held the refuge hostage in open defiance of the federal government. Director David Byars’s film documents their ultimately quixotic demonstration, from its inception to its dramatic demise. His film is called No Man’s Land, and he’ll join us to talk about it.

Wednesday, we’re talking about Julius Caesar. You can probably guess why we’re having the conversation. A New York production of Shakespeare’s work recently caused a stir when the play’s director made Julius Caesar look a lot like Donald Trump. The problem is of course that Caesar gets assassinated. So, we’re talking about Julius Caesar the man, Shakespeare’s play, and the relationship between art and politics.

The Perfect Horse

Jun 20, 2017
Judy Fahys

Tuesday, the story of a daring rescue of horses caught up in the Third Reich’s vision for genetic supremacy. Horses still played a role in the military, and Hitler aimed to use stolen purebreds to create the ideal war horse. But with the stud farm under imminent threat from the starving Russian army, the Nazi officer in charge asked General Patton himself for help. Author Elizabeth Letts joins us to explain why soldiers set aside alliances and risked their lives to save The Perfect Horse. [Rebroadcast]

Roland Li via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2sgtqzc

Monday, we’re talking about the Democratic Party in Utah, and we’re asking this question: is the party still relevant? It wasn’t long ago that Utah had a Democratic governor, or a Democratic congressional delegate. But, oh, how times have changed. Democrats now hold just 12 of 75 seats in the state legislature. The party won only 10 of 55 contested state races in last year’s general election, and Dems lost many of those races by massive margins. So what gives? And what can the party do to reverse its fortunes?

Biblical Literalism

Jun 16, 2017

Retired Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong presents a provocative idea in his latest book. Reading the Bible literally, he says, is heresy. He bases his argument on a close reading of the Gospel of Matthew, which he argues was written by Jews for Jews. Spong says the gospel was not written as a literal account of Christ’s life, but rather as an interpretative portrait of God’s love. Spong joins us Friday to talk about biblical literalism and his uniquely progressive approach to Christianity. (Rebroadcast)

Public domain

When you think about military science, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Bombs and guns, right? Well, that’s not what interests the writer Mary Roach, who has a habit of seeking out eccentric scientific corners. She’s not so much curious about the killing as she is about the keeping alive. That curiosity led her to research into the battlefield’s more obscure threats: exhaustion, shock, bacteria, panic, even turkey vultures. Roach is coming to Utah, so we're rebroadcasting our conversation with her about the science of humans at war. (Rebroadcast)

Land on Fire

Jun 14, 2017
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Public Domain

Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. Climate change has led to less snow, longer droughts, and more wind and there’s a lot of fuel on the forest floors. The result is ten more weeks of fire season than we saw in the early 70s, and those fires are hotter and often beyond control. Ferguson joins us Wednesday to talk about the role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West.

U.S. Department of the Interior, CC BY-SA 2.0

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted a report to the White House over the weekend recommending Bears Ears National Monument be shrunk. While there are places there he thinks should be protected by the Antiquities Act, Zinke says the boundaries should be revised. He also suggests congress consider different conservation plans for the area, re-examine wilderness designations, and approve co-management by Native American tribes. Tuesday, we’re talking about what all this means for the future of Bears Ears.

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