Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways To Connect

October 30, 2015 | Just in time for Halloween, Radio Hour returns to the RadioWest studio where it began a decade ago. Doug Fabrizio becomes another kind of host when he interviews the author of a new book on paranormal activity. A co-production with Plan-B Theatre Company.

Gilberto Tadday

When a mixed martial arts studio moved in across the street from literary scholar Jonathan Gottschall’s office, the timing couldn’t have been better. Gottschall was in a mid-life crisis; he was out of shape and his academic career was stalling. So joining the gym was personal, but he was also fascinated by these questions: Why do men fight and why do we like to watch? Wednesday, Gottschall joins Doug to talk about his experience in the cage, and about violence and the rituals that contain it. [Rebroadcast]

Elephant Company

Aug 3, 2015

 

When author Vicki Constantine Croke saw an illustration of an elephant and rider on a precarious cliff ledge from 1943, she wanted to know more. It was of “Elephant Bill” Williams, an Englishman who was a gifted trainer and champion of elephants in Burma. His work made headlines though when the Japanese invaded, and his “Elephant Company” managed a daring escape over treacherous mountain terrain. Tuesday, Croke joins us to tell the story of Williams, the animals he loved and the lessons they taught him about courage and trust. [Rebroadcast]

Rain

Aug 3, 2015

  The environmental journalist Cynthia Barnett says humans have always tried to control rain. We’ve burned witches at the stake to stop it. We’ve sacrificed children to bring it. Now we’ve used technology to change it, with results we weren’t intending. Barnett has written a book she calls a natural and cultural history of rain. And whether you love a rainy night or rainy days bring you down, Barnett joins us Monday to explain how the story of rain is one we all share. (Rebroadcast)

 

Mary Norris has spent more than three decades in The New Yorker's copy editing department, maintaining the magazine’s high standards for grammar, punctuation, and style. In a new book, she shares her vast knowledge, good cheer, and sharp pencil with the rest of us. It’s partly a book of practical advice on language usage, and it also offers a peek inside the hallowed halls of one of the world’s most important publications. Norris joins us Friday to share what she's learned as a self-proclaimed "comma queen." [Rebroadcast]

The Big Fat Surprise

Jul 28, 2015

Since the 1950s, a war has been waged in America against an accused dietary culprit: fat. Avoid fat, we were told, and you’ll live longer and healthier. However, as the investigative journalist Nina Teicholz discovered, there isn’t solid evidence of the benefits of a low-fat diet nor of the dangers of fat. In a new book, Teicholz reviews the science and history of the war on fat and Tuesday we're rebroadcasting a conversation about how America’s nutrition was derailed by a bunch of bad science. [Rebroadcast]

Nature Needs Half

Jul 27, 2015

For centuries, humans have used technology to alter the planet, with dramatic consequences for the environment. Some think technology can also be used to manage our way out of these problems. It’s an approach that places humans at the center of everything. But conservationist Harvey Locke builds his work around a different idea: we do not control the world; we are part of it. Locke advocates a "wiser" relationship with nature, and Monday, he joins Doug in studio to talk about his goal to conserve half the world’s land and water. (Rebroadcast)

Sandra Wahl via Flickr/Creative Commons & University of Utah Press

The growing season is just ramping up, which means that many people will soon be enjoying the bounty of summer's harvest. Friday, we’re discussing a solution to that problem: food preservation. We’ll be talking about the joys, traditions, and methods of putting food by when produce crops are heaviest. We’ll also explore Mormon pioneer foodways and uncover the culinary challenges and delights of settling the Great Salt Lake Basin.

GUESTS

Thursday, Iranian-American author Azar Nafisi joins us to talk about the state of literature and the humanities in the US. Using the great American works Huck FinnBabbitt, and The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, she argues the greatest danger to the literary arts is not a totalitarian regime, but the "intellectual indolence" of the public. Nafisi says it matters because literature is more than entertainment; it is a guide to a better society. Her book is called The Republic of Imagination. (Rebroadcast)

How Fashion Works

Jul 22, 2015

Longtime NPR correspondent Jacki Lyden now leads a radio and podcast project called The SEAMS. It’s an audio expedition of the fashion world and it explores how our clothes connect us to each other. To Lyden, everything we wear says something, whether we intend it to or not. She and fashion designer Simon Doonan join us Wednesday to discuss how fashion works. Is it merely trivial and frivolous, or does it say something important about our history and culture? [Rebroadcast]

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