Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

The Road Not Taken

Feb 5, 2016

 

“Two roads diverged in a yellow wood . . .” Those are the first words to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken." One hundred years after their publication, Frost’s immortal lines remain unbelievably popular. The poem seems straightforward enough: it's about boldly living outside conformity, right? Wrong, says poetry columnist David Orr. He says nearly everyone hopelessly misreads Frost's poem. Orr joins us Friday as we explore the meaning of "The Road Not Taken" and the history behind it. [Rebroadcast]

  Thursday, we continue our Through the Lens series with Matt Fuller and Carolina Groppa's documentary film about the challenges of finding love. Finding and managing a romantic relationship can be hard for just about anyone, but for those on the autism spectrum, it’s exceptionally difficult. Fuller and Groppa's film offers a deeply personal look into the lives of four people with autism as they struggle to overcome their troubles with communication and personal interaction to find true romance.

The Gift of Failure

Feb 3, 2016
Photo by Chiara Stevani, CC via Flickr

Educator, writer, and parent Jessica Lahey understands the impulse to step in and try to make things easier for our kids. We want to protect them and provide for them, but when we smooth out every uncomfortable bump and obstacle, she says we also take away their chance to successfully navigate life’s “pointy bits” for themselves. Lahey has written a new book called The Gift of Failure and Wednesday she joins Doug to discuss how parents can learn to let go so their children can succeed. (Rebroadcast)

Last week, an advocacy group made headlines when they said there’s been a startling increase in suicides among LGBT Mormon youth. They blamed LDS Church policy which labels members in same-sex marriages as apostates. It’s hard to get a line on those statistics though, and while the anecdotal numbers are problematic, they still raise serious concerns. Tuesday, we’re asking what we know about depression and suicide in gay Mormons and whether the Church’s vocal stance contributes to that risk.

Spinster

Feb 1, 2016

 

Journalist Kate Bolick likes the word "spinster," though she wants to redefine it. She says that until recently there have been two stereotypes of unmarried women: fabulous and frivolous or pathetic and desperate. But today, there are more than 100 million American women who are single, and Bolick says it’s a choice to live life on your own terms. Monday, she joins Doug to talk about her single life, and the lives of 19th- and 20th-century “spinsters” who emboldened her. [Rebroadcast]

Sundance 2016: Nuts!

Jan 29, 2016

Friday, we wrap up our coverage of the Sundance Film Festival with a true story of desperation, scams, and goat testicles. Director Penny Lane joins us to talk about John Romulus Brinkley, a man who claimed to have a cure for impotence and many other ailments in 1920s Kansas. He took to newfangled radio to tout his unorthodox treatments, but soon found his nemesis in one Morris Fishbein, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Lane’s film is called NUTS!

Frank Zappa wasn’t just a musician, bandleader, and self-taught composer who released more than 60 albums in less than three decades. He was also a passionate and outspoken proponent of free expression. Filmmaker Thorsten Schutte has made a new documentary that draws from Zappa’s numerous interviews and TV appearances, using the iconic musician’s own words to explore his unique career and provocative opinions. Schutte joins us Thursday as we continue our coverage of the Sundance Film Festival.

  Filmmaker Will Allen was 22 when he joined a community of people led by a man named Michel. Allen says at first he seemed elegant and smart and he promised them enlightenment. But it became clear Michel was a megalomaniac and he was soon leading by manipulation, paranoia, and abuse. As the group fell apart, Allen knew he had to find a way out of what he came to realize was a cult. Wednesday, he and former member Christopher Johnston join Doug to talk about the Sundance documentary HOLY HELL.

Filmmaker Robert Greene thought for years about a documentary on Christine Chubbuck, a Florida news reporter who committed suicide on live television in 1974. What he didn’t want to do though was make a straight-forward movie about a depressed woman. So Greene proposed an unorthodox approach to actress Kate Lyn Sheil. The film crew would follow Sheil as she prepared to take on the tragic role of Christine. Tuesday, Greene joins Doug to talk about performance, authenticity, and storytelling.

Monday, we continue our Sundance coverage with AUDRIE & DAISY. The two teen girls were raped and this documentary examines the fallout of shaming and bullying on social media that followed. Audrie was overwhelmed by what she saw as irreparable damage to her reputation and committed suicide. Daisy's story made national headlines, and her family became the target of an enraged community. Filmmakers Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk join Doug to explore what they call a modern-day "Scarlet Letter."

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