Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways To Connect

October 30, 2015 | Just in time for Halloween, Radio Hour returns to the RadioWest studio where it began a decade ago. Doug Fabrizio becomes another kind of host when he interviews the author of a new book on paranormal activity. A co-production with Plan-B Theatre Company.

Great girdle of Aphrodite! Monday, historian Jill Lepore joins Doug to tell the story of Wonder Woman, who she calls the “missing link” in the women’s rights struggles of the 20th century. Wonder Woman was created by psychologist William Marston, whose own family was very, very complicated and deeply influenced by the suffrage movement. We’ll talk about Wonder Woman’s feminist roots, the “new type of woman” Marston had in mind, and her influence on the women’s lib movement of the ‘60s and ‘70s.

The average person has about 4,000 thoughts a day. Most are fleeting snippets, some are banal, and sometimes, they can be disruptive. But when most people question whether they left the coffee maker on or imagine something bizarre like jumping out into traffic, they shake it off. A person with OCD though can’t let it go, and may spend as many as 6 hours a day obsessing over that one idea. Friday, Doug’s guest is the science writer David Adam. He’s written a book about OCD and his own life lost in thought. (Rebroadcast)

Shoe historian Elizabeth Semmelhack says there’s a stereotype that footwear is somehow a woman’s domain. But consider this: in 2014, men’s athletic shoes accounted for nearly twice the sales of women’s dress shoes in U.S. stores. Over the last century, sneakers have symbolized performance and affluence, street style and high-end fashion. Thursday, Semmelhack is our guide for a history of sneakers. We’ll talk about innovations, trends, and what each shoe tells us about a particular moment in time.

Andrew Myers, http://www.andrewbmyers.com/

In a new article in The Atlantic magazine, Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt decry what they see as a worrisome trend on college campuses. Students, they say, are increasingly demanding to be shielded from words, ideas, and subjects they dislike. Haidt and Lukianoff are concerned that students are in turn damaging themselves intellectually, emotionally, and psychologically. Lukianoff joins us Wednesday to explain why he thinks college kids are being unduly coddled. We’ll also hear an opposing viewpoint.

Abby Bischoff via CC?Flick, http://bit.ly/1LwB2C8

One argument for extending legal rights to LGBT people is that they’re born with their sexualities and gender preferences, just as a person is born with their skin color. But legal scholar Clifford Rosky and psychologist Lisa Diamond say that logic is unscientific, legally unnecessary, and it unjustly excludes other sexual minorities. Rosky, Diamond, and philosopher Jim Tabery join us Tuesday to discuss how the nature versus nurture debate continues to shape how we think about ourselves and each other.

LDS Missions

Aug 24, 2015

Two men with white shirts and name badges may be *the* stereotype of Mormons. 85,000 missionaries are currently proselytizing for the LDS Church, but that’s not all a mission is for. The scholar Patrick Mason says it’s a rite of passage, as much about making and keeping the missionary a member of the church as it is recruiting new converts. Monday, Mason and historian Greg Prince join Doug to discuss the history of LDS missions, what’s changing and what it all means for the young men and women who serve.

Best of Enemies

Aug 21, 2015
Best of Enemies

Friday, director Robert Gordon joins us to discuss his documentary film Best of Enemies, which profiles the caustic rivalry between Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley Jr. Two brilliant and eloquent men who represented two wholly opposite ideologies, they engaged in a first-of-its kind series of televised debates in 1968 during the political national conventions. The broadcasts burned with the fire of the men’s mutual hatred for one another and it laid the groundwork for the future of TV. (Rebroadcast)

The Gift of Failure

Aug 20, 2015

Educator, writer, and parent Jessica Lahey understands the impulse to step in and try to make things easier for our kids. We want to protect them and provide for them, but when we smooth out every uncomfortable bump and obstacle, she says we also take away their chance to successfully navigate life’s “pointy bits” for themselves. Lahey has written a new book called The Gift of Failure and Thursday, she joins Doug to discuss how parents can learn to let go so their children can succeed. 

Listen to Me Marlon

Aug 19, 2015

Marlon Brando wasn’t just one of the most acclaimed and influential actors of all time, he was also one of the most elusive and enigmatic. In the new documentary Listen to Me Marlon, filmmaker Stevan Riley charts Brando’s career on camera and the life he lived away from it. He tells the story using no talking heads or interviewees. Brando kept an extensive archive of personal audio recordings, and it’s his words that tell his story. Riley joins us Wednesday to talk about Brando’s life and legacy.

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