Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

Public domain

If you’ve ever seen paintings by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Bosch’s death, and Monday, art historian Gary Schwartz joins us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art.

Photo by Karl Hugh. Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016

Utah Shakespeare Festival is performing Much Ado About Nothing, and we’re using it as an excuse to talk about Shakespeare’s women. Scholar Kate McPherson says few Elizabethan playwrights created female characters as rich as the Bard, and that Much Ado is his most sophisticated play about women. It features Beatrice, a feisty and fearless lady who has forsworn love. McPherson, actor Kim Martin-Cotten, and director David Ivers join us to talk about Beatrice and the challenges and opportunities afforded women in Shakespeare’s world.

Henry V

Aug 25, 2016
Photo by Karl Hugh. Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

Thursday, we’re live at the Utah Shakespeare Festival with a look at the bard’s great history  Henry V. Director Brian Vaughn says the play represents a battle of conscience. Through two earlier works, Shakespeare’s audience knows Prince Hal as a wild and irresponsible young man. But now he has the crown, and must weigh right and wrong to grow into the role of king. We’ll talk about the character, how he’s been portrayed over time, and what the play has to say about leadership and authority.

The Hour of Land

Aug 24, 2016
From <a href="http://ansleywest.com/">Ansley West Rivers</a>' photo series "Lunar Traces"

 

Wednesday, writer and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams joins Doug to discuss her latest book, The Hour of Land. It’s a paean to America’s natural parks. The parks are, Williams says, fundamental to our national identity, despite our complicated relationship with them. To mark the centennial of the National Parks Service, Williams visited 12 national parks. She wanted to better understand their relevance in the 21st century. She also wondered if they might serve to help unite our fractured country. [Rebroadcast]

Karl Hugh. Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

Swoon over Shakespeare? Think Doug Fabrizio is pretty fabulous? The RadioWest team is heading south to the Utah Shakespeare Festival for live shows Thursday, August 25th and Friday, August 26th. What’s a live radio show without a live audience? Join us on the Eccles Grand Promenade at the Engelstad Theatre for behind-the-scene scoops on the current productions of Henry V and Much Ado About Nothing while watching your favorite radio show live in action.

Come, let us thither! It won’t be the same without you.

Sanofi Pasteur (changes made) via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/rm35f8, https://goo.gl/cefU8

New York Times reporter Donald McNeil’s new book begins with a mysterious illness that broke out in Brazil in March 2015. The rash and flu-like symptoms were temporary and few were hospitalized. When the Zika virus was pinned as the culprit, Brazil’s health minister brushed it aside as “a benign disease.” Then, nine months later, the babies arrived. Babies with tiny heads. McNeil’s new book tells the story of Zika and he joins us Thursday to assess the very real threat posed by the emerging epidemic.

KUER News

When Governor Gary Herbert appointed Spencer Cox as Utah’s Lieutenant Governor in 2013, his communications team suggested that Cox edit his bio. They wanted him to take out the part about being in a rock band. But Spencer Cox says that’s what’s wrong with politicians. They’re so worried about re-election, they’re afraid to say “I play the bass.” Monday, Cox joins Doug to talk about unconventional political choices, his 100-mile commute, and why he’s still rockin’ bass lines with his band UpSide.

A Clockwork Orange

Aug 19, 2016

Author Anthony Burgess said his novella A Clockwork Orange should have been forgotten, but because of Stanley Kubrick's film, it seemed destined to live on. It's the story of the barbaric passions of a British teen and the state's attempt to impose a mechanistic morality over his free-will. This weekend, The Salt Lake Film Society is screening the film, so Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with the scholar Andrew Biswell. He joined us to explain why Burgess said the point of the book has been widely misunderstood. (Rebroadcast)

On Trails

Aug 18, 2016
Rich via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/uk4xos, https://goo.gl/xYWc9B

In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us Thursday to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike.

The history of Salt Lake City quintet Quiet Oaks is anything but quiet. Four of the band mates played together in a group that broke up after a falling-out with a frontman. Rather than call it quits, they decided to rebuild as Quiet Oaks, refining their take on classic rock into the sound they’ve always aspired to. Now on the western leg of a 42-show tour across America, Quiet Oaks joins us Wednesday to discuss their music and picking up the pieces to become the band they’ve always wanted.

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