Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways To Connect

Cancer was first mentioned in an ancient Egyptian scroll and through the modern era, its history is marked by the epic battles we've waged against it. Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer physician, and in trying to understand what his patients must endure, he turned a historical and literary eye on cancer. His Pulitzer-prize winning book is now a PBS documentary premiering Monday. So, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Mukherjee about the disease he calls “The Emperor of All Maladies.” (Rebroadcast)

The Arabian Nights

Mar 26, 2015

Perhaps you know the tale. In order to save her life, Sheherazade starts spinning stories for the vengeful King Shahriyar. One story leads to another that leads to another, on and on for 1,001 nights. For the scholar Robert Irwin, Sheherazade's plight is our own, for what are our lives but stories related to countless other stories, all told under the shadow of death, the terminator of all stories? Irwin joins us Thursday as we explore the world of the Arabian Nights and ask what they can offer us today.

How Fashion Works

Mar 25, 2015

Longtime NPR correspondent Jacki Lyden has started a new project called The SEAMS. It’s an audio expedition of the fashion world and it explores how our clothes connect us to each other. To Lyden, everything we wear says something, whether we intend it to or not. She and fashion designer Simon Doonan join us Wednesday to discuss how fashion works and we hope to hear from you. What does your wardrobe say about you? What do you notice about other people’s clothes? And we can exempt ourselves from fashion?

Animal Madness

Mar 24, 2015
Photo by Emily Orpin, CC via Flickr

 

Laurel Braitman was very worried about her dog’s mental health. Oliver was an anxious animal, especially when left home alone. And he was alone when he moved an air conditioner, chewed through a screen, and jumped out of a 3rd story window. Braitman is a science historian, and her new book explores seemingly human mental disorders in the animal kingdom. Tuesday, she joins Doug to explain why every animal with a mind has the capacity to lose it from time to time. [Rebroadcast]

A Climate for Change

Mar 23, 2015

  Why is it that conservative Christians are more likely to be climate change skeptics than any other religious group in America?  Katharine Hayhoe doesn’t see any reason why science and religion should be mutually exclusive. She’s a leading climate scientist, but she’s also an evangelical who’s married to a minister. She says part of the problem is that we’ve confused politics with faith. Hayhoe is in Utah, and Monday, she joins us to talk about religion, the environment, and bridging the divide between them.

An Honest Liar

Mar 20, 2015

James "The Amazing" Randi is a renowned magician and escape artist, but he can’t abide charlatans. So he turned his energy to exposing psychics and con-artists with intricate investigations and hoaxes of his own. His story is the focus of a documentary by Utah filmmaker Tyler Measom. It's opening in Salt Lake City this weekend, so we're rebroadcasting our conversation with Measom about Randi's crusade for truth and how all of us, even "The Amazing" Randi himself, are susceptible to deception. (Rebroadcast)

Why Acting Matters

Mar 19, 2015
Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

In a new book, film critic David Thomson tackles this question: Does acting matter? Put another way, when economies struggle, wars explode, and climate change looms, what’s the value of the performing arts? Thomson thinks acting is important, but not because it tries to be realistic. Acting matters, he says, because it empowers us to escape reality, and to exalt and despair over it. Thomson joins us Thursday to examine the methods and genius of the great actors and to explore how we all perform every day.

  Wednesday, literary historian Leslie Klinger is with us to talk about an early master of science fiction and horror. H.P. Lovecraft’s writing was a departure from his gothic predecessors. He created a strange mythos in which aliens and unspeakable creatures shared our world. And that world was shaped by Lovecraft’s own troubling realities: he was terrified of going insane and he was a deeply racist man. We’ll talk about Lovecraft’s rise from obscurity and his influence on writers today.

  The average person has about 4,000 thoughts a day. Most are fleeting snippets, some are banal, and sometimes, they can be disruptive. But when most people question whether they left the coffee maker or imagine something bizarre like jumping out into traffic, they shake it off. A person with OCD though can’t let it go, and may spend as many as 6 hours a day obsessing over that one idea. Tuesday, Doug’s guest is the science writer David Adam. He’s written a book about OCD and his own life lost in thought.

  Monday, we’re focusing on one of the most talked about bills of the 2015 legislative session: the LGBT anti-discrimination bill. Republican Representative Brad Dee called it the “Utah solution.” It was crafted with careful negotiation between the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the LGBT community, and clarified exemptions for religious organizations. We’ll talk about the role the Church played in getting it passed and what the legislation does or doesn’t do for LGBT people and people of faith.

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