Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

From <a href="http://ansleywest.com/">Ansley West Rivers</a>' photo series "Lunar Traces"

Wednesday, writer and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams joins Doug to discuss her latest book, The Hour of Land. It’s a paean to America’s natural parks. The parks are, Williams says, fundamental to our national identity, despite our complicated relationship with them. To mark the centennial of the National Parks Service, Williams visited 12 national parks. She wanted to better understand their relevance in the 21st century. She also wondered if they might serve to help unite our fractured country.

<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New_Harmony_by_F._Bate_(View_of_a_Community,_as_proposed_by_Robert_Owen)_printed_1838.jpg">Public domain</a>

What should the future look like? That’s the question posed by ambitious, sometimes delusional Americans in the early 1800s who dedicated themselves to creating new ways of living. You had Mother Ann Lee’s Shakers; the Oneida community in New York; New Harmony, Indiana; intentional communities inspired by French socialist Charles Fourier; and the roots of a communist paradise in Texas. Tuesday, the writer Chris Jennings joins us to explore the idealism and the lasting impact of these five utopian movements.

In 1942 the Japanese army forced about 70,000 US and Philippine prisoners of war to march some 80 miles across the Bataan Peninsula on the way to a prison camp. More than 10,000 died or were summarily executed along the way. Among the survivors was Gene Jacobsen, who published a book about the ordeal. Jacobsen died in 2007 at the age of 85. Monday, we're rebroadcasting his story of three and a half years as a prisoner of war. [Rebroadcast]

Holy Hell

May 27, 2016

Filmmaker Will Allen was 22 when he joined a community of people led by a man named Michel. Allen says at first he seemed elegant and smart and he promised them enlightenment. But it became clear Michel was a megalomaniac and he was soon leading by manipulation, paranoia, and abuse. As the group fell apart, Allen knew he had to find a way out of what he came to realize was a cult. Friday, he and former member Christopher Johnston join Doug to talk about the documentary film Holy Hell. [Rebroadcast]

Thursday, we’re telling stories of legendary Utah Symphony conductor Maurice Abravanel. The Maestro led the symphony for 32 years with the philosophy that good music should be available to everyone. He created a pioneering education program and built the orchestra into an internationally renowned recording powerhouse with some 120 albums. Former associate conductor Ardean Watts and retired cellist Carolee Baron will join us to talk about the life and musical passions of Maestro Maurice Abravanel.

woodleywonderworks via <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC</a>/<a href="http://bit.ly/246ypvp">Flickr</a>, cropped

A few years ago, Paul Tough wrote a book about new research showing that character traits like grit, self-control, and optimism are critical to a child’s success. Tough’s latest book builds on that research by explaining how to put it into practice. He argues that a child’s home and school environments are the principle barriers to his or her success. Improve the environment, Tough says, and you can improve the child. He joins us Wednesday to explain his theory of helping children succeed.

  

A.O. Scott has been a film critic for the New York Times for more than 15 years, so it may seem strange that he’s now questioning the value of his work. In a new book, he asks what the point of criticism actually is. Scott argues that critical thinking informs almost every aspect of artistic creation, of civil action, and of our interactions with each other. In that way, he says, we’re all critics. Scott joins us Tuesday for a discussion about art, pleasure, beauty, truth, and of course criticism. [Rebroadcast]

The Gene

May 23, 2016

Monday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a new book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information?

Elephant Company

May 20, 2016

When author Vicki Constantine Croke saw an illustration of an elephant and rider on a precarious cliff ledge from 1943, she wanted to know more. It was of “Elephant Bill” Williams, an Englishman who was a gifted trainer and champion of elephants in Burma. His work made headlines though when the Japanese invaded, and his “Elephant Company” managed a daring escape over treacherous mountain terrain. Croke joins us to tell the story of Williams, the animals he loved and the lessons they taught him about courage and trust. (Rebroadcast)

<a href="https://www.reverbnation.com/connect">Reverb Nation/CONNECT</a>

Rolling Stone has called Ogden-based singer-songwriter Sammy Brue an “Americana prodigy.” He started playing music at 10 years old when he got a guitar for Christmas. He cut his teeth on tunes by Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie, and in two months he was writing his own songs. Well, Sammy’s 15 now. He’s put out an EP record, gained acclaim at music festivals across the country, and signed a record deal with a Nashville label. He’ll join us Thursday to play some music and talk about his budding career.

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