Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer, RadioWest

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

Leon Reed via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2cXKAdT

In the summer of 1972, a young man named Harry Walker left his family’s farm in Alabama and headed for adventure in Yellowstone where he was killed by a grizzly bear. The subsequent court battle raised serious questions about how we manage America’s national parks. In a new book, the writer Jordan Fisher Smith traces Walker’s fatal path, which led him to questions about how much humans should try to engineer nature and soften its sharp edges for our own enjoyment. Jordan joins us Monday to talk about it.

Coyote America

Sep 23, 2016
Andy Simonds via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/F46KAg

Wednesday we’re talking about a homegrown American success: coyotes. The country has been at war with the iconic species since white settlers first reached the heartland plains. But coyotes, according to historian Dan Flores, not only survived our assault on them, they simultaneously expanded their range across the continent and into our cities. Flores joins us Friday to explore the coyote’s fascinating story of resilience and adaptability and how it parallels our own version of Manifest Destiny.

The Last Ship

Sep 22, 2016
Photo by Brent Uberty. Courtesy Pioneer Theatre Company

The musician Sting says writer’s block led him back to the hometown he had worked so hard to escape. Wallsend was a shipbuilding center in Northern England, but he was never interested in being a shipwright. The stories of the men and women there called to him though, and they became the basis for his musical The Last Ship. Pioneer Theatre Company opened its production last week, and Thursday, director Karen Azenberg and others join us to talk about the themes of work, identity, and coming home.

Pinpoint

Sep 21, 2016

Even if you didn’t use GPS to find your way around town today, there’s every chance it touched your life. The Global Positioning System is now integrated into almost every part of modern existence. It helps land planes, route cell phone calls, predict the weather, grow food, and regulate global finance. Our guest Thursday, Greg Milner, has written a book that traces the history of GPS. He also examines the frightening costs of our growing dependence on it. 

Al Hartmann, Salt Lake Tribune https://goo.gl/1W8Xbh

In November 2009, John Jones, his brother, and a number of friends, went exploring in Nutty Putty Cave. Thousands of people visited the popular cave every year, but Jones was the last tourist to ever delve into its passages. Deep in an unmapped portion, Jones got stuck, and rescuers worked for dozens of hours to free him. Jones died in the cave, which was later permanently sealed. A new feature film tells the story of the Nutty Putty tragedy and Tuesday we’re talking about it.

Local Music: 3hattrio

Sep 19, 2016

What do you get if you cross a cowboy singer, a Caribbean percussionist and a classical violinist? Well, if it happens in Virgin, Utah, folklorist and musician Hal Cannon says you get a new kind of Western music. He’s the cowboy singer and 1/3 of 3hattrio. They’ve just released their third album, and Monday, he joins us along with career musician Greg Istock and 19-year-old Eli Wrankle to explain why they say the West was ready for a new genre and how they began creating “desert music.”

How To Be a Tudor

Sep 16, 2016

To understand how our forebears lived, of course you’ll read period records, diaries and literature. There would still be things you wouldn’t fully grasp though, like how they smelled. So when historian Ruth Goodman wanted to understand 16th century English life, she “tudored.” She skipped bathing, brushed her teeth with soot, and slept on rushes. The result of her adventure is a new book called How to Be a Tudor, and she joins Doug for a dawn-to-dusk guide to Tudor life. (Rebroadcast)

Courtesy University of Utah

Recently, KUER reported on an environmental activist with concerns about corporations like Kennecott Land being listed as “friends” of the University of Utah’s Environmental Humanities Program. Carl Ingwell says they don’t reflect environmental values, and shouldn’t be associated with the program. But as higher education faces continued cut-backs in public spending, what is the proper relationship between corporate donors and university researchers? And what do each get out of the bargain? Thursday, Doug’s guests help us work through those and other questions.

Defying the Nazis

Sep 14, 2016
Andover Harvard Theological Library

In January 1939, Unitarian minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha received a call: would they travel to Europe to help Jewish dissidents and refugees under threat of Nazi persecution? While few Americans were paying attention to Hitler’s growing power, the Sharps agreed to the dangerous mission. A new PBS film explores their incredible work, and Wednesday, filmmaker Artemis Joukowsky joins us to talk about how the Sharp’s actions saved hundreds and altered the course of their own lives.

Being a Beast

Sep 13, 2016
Henry Holt & Co.

Charles Foster wanted to know what it was like to be a beast. What it was really like. So he tried it out. He slept in a dirt hole and ate earthworms like a badger. He chased shrimp like an otter. He spent hours rooting in trashcans like an urban fox. A passionate naturalist, Foster came to realize that every creature creates a different world in its brain and lives in that world. He joins us Tuesday to talk about his experiment and the values of wildness, both outside us and within us.

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