Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

Kelsie Moore / KUER

Thursday, Doug talks to Christine Durham, who has just retired after 35 years as Utah’s first female Supreme Court justice. But Durham has also been called the person who has done more for Utah’s judicial branch than anyone else - man or woman.

Jonathan E. Shaw via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2zIYPQm

Genghis Khan was the greatest conqueror in human history. He was a ruthless warrior known for his scorched earth tactics. So it may surprise you to learn that he was a deeply principled and passionate man, and a champion of religious freedom.

The US ranks 31st in math skills among 35 developed countries. So what are schools in Europe and Asia doing that we aren’t? Journalist Amanda Ripley joins us to talk about The Smartest Kids in the World.

And Thrasher via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2B1Fki7

Monday, we’re wading into the debate over the GOP tax cut plan. Who will it benefit the most? Some economists contend it's an act of pure greed and “daylight robbery,” while others say trickle-down tax cuts can restore American prosperity.

 

Friday, we're talking about how unhealthy sugar is for you. No, we're not trying to be killjoys. But as you recover from and regret that third helping of pie on Thanksgiving, we thought you might want to know why you'd probably be healthier without sugar. (Rebroadcast)

Courtesy of Kristen Oney / Plimoth Plantation

 

When they landed at Plymouth almost 400 years ago, the Pilgrims faced countless challenges. Their story is the bedrock of the American experiment, but the facts of their survival have long been tangled up with the myths. (Rebroadcast)

Josué Menjivar via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/2zqVOnr


Changing people’s minds is hard. And it’s a problem a lot of people encounter on Thanksgiving. Neuroscientist Tali Sharot studies decision-making. She says we can better influence people by understanding how the brain is wired.

Tuesday, we’re talking about the history versus the memory of the Civil War. Yale historian David Blight says there’s a lot of misunderstanding about the period, but getting it right matters because the stories we tell about who we were then define who are now.

iGen

Nov 20, 2017
Anthony Kelly via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2xMGmgU

Psychologist Jean Twenge joins us to talk about the kids these days. She says teenagers today are different than the Millenials that preceded them. They’re more depressed, more suicidal and less independent. The reason? It could be smartphones.

Public Domain

Friday, we’re talking to historian Richard Francis about Samuel Sewell. He was one of the judges during the Salem Witch Hunt in 1692. There were actually 9 judges who sent 20 people to their deaths, but only Sewell came forward to say he was sorry.

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