Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

How Pleasure Works

Aug 26, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/albx79/2568081951/">Alberto Colombo</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Friday on RadioWest, the psychologist Paul Bloom joins Doug to explain how pleasure works. This is more than just about the simple pleasures of food or sex. How do you account for the pleasure of seeing a painting, for example, or for some, the pleasure of getting spanked? Pleasure is complicated, and Bloom says it's grounded in a belief about the essence of a thing. It's a conversation about philosophy, neuroscience, evolution, childhood development ... about why we desire what we desire. (Rebroadcast)

This past Monday, Utah Representative Jason Chaffetz announced he would not run against six-term Senator Orrin Hatch. Many observers were anticipating a race between the two Republicans and potential candidates were waiting to see what Chaffetz might do before throwing their hats in the ring. Thursday on RadioWest, we'll talk with Congressman Chaffetz about his decision and about his goals in Washington. We'll also be joined by a panel to discuss what all of this means for Utah in 2012.

Boys of Bonneville

Aug 24, 2011

Wednesday, we're talking about Ab Jenkins, a Utah man who pushed the limits of speed. More than 70 years ago, Jenkins raced his custom-built Duesenberg Special called the "Mormon Meteor" across the Bonneville Salt Flats. Jenkins set 26 records in that car and half of them still stand today. Now, there's a new documentary about Ab Jenkins and the Boys of Bonneville. We'll talk to director Curt Wallin and others about the film and about the newly restored Mormon Meteor.

Lunch Wars

Aug 23, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wlscience/4569761556/">Ben W</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

The average American kid will have some 3,000 school lunches by the twelfth grade. But what are they eating? When filmmaker and author Amy Kalafa went into school cafeterias, she found lunch trays laden with chicken nuggets and French fries, but little in the way of healthy choices. The question she kept hearing from parents though was "What do we do about it?" Kalafa has written a book called "Lunch Wars," and Tuesday, she joins us to explain how to start a school food revolution.

<a href="http://www.rickperry.org/" target="_blank">www.rickperry.org</a>

Texas Governor Rick Perry is shaking up the GOP Presidential race. Within 3 days of entering, a Rasmussen poll already showed him with a double digit lead over Romney and Bachmann. Perry's appealing to the Evangelical Christian vote with a massive prayer rally earlier this month and his vocal skepticism on issues like evolution. Monday, we're talking about Perry's faith and about his relationship to the New Apostolic Reformation - a conservative Christian movement with clear political goals.

Lost in Shangri-La

Aug 19, 2011

Doug talks to Mitchell Zuckoff, author of the book Lost in Shangri-La. In 1945, a site seeing plane of American soldiers crashed in a remote, mysterious valley in Dutch New Guinea. The local tribe was rumored to be head-hunters and had never before been in contact with white people. But the three survivors were caught between the valley and the Japanese enemy. Zuckoff joins us to tell the story of the time they spent with the Dani tribesmen and the daring rescue that brought them home. (Rebroadcast)

Far Between

Aug 18, 2011

Last month, filmmaker Kendall Wilcox made a bold decision. He decided it was the right time for him to admit publically that he is gay. Of course, this process can be difficult for anyone, but Wilcox is an employee of the LDS Church, he teaches at Brigham Young University and he's a producer for BYUTV. Now, he's in the process of making a film that explores the tension between faith and sexual identity. Thursday, Wilcox joins Doug to talk about being "Far Between."

New Music of 2011

Aug 17, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/guidosportaal/4036379423/">Guido S</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

What new music has grabbed your attention this summer? Wednesday, Doug is joined by Bob Boilen, host of NPR's All Songs Considered. Boilen's bringing along his favorite music (so far) of 2011. There are a few names you've heard and a few that might be new to you. There's alternative music, indie rock and some R&B influence. Of course, there's at least a song or two that's just really hard to put into a category.

Rebirth

Aug 16, 2011

We're continuing our documentary film series "Through the Lens" with director and producer Jim Whitaker. Whitaker is the creator of Rebirth, a film that captures a "living history" of September 11. It follows the journey of five people directly affected by the tragedy - a sort of time lapse of their grief, their memories and their path to recovery. Whitaker joins Doug on Tuesday and we'll screen the film Thursday night.

Monday, we're talking about the controversy surrounding Salt Lake City's proposal for a new 2,500 seat theater on Main Street. Proponents say it's another step in the revitalization of downtown and that the venue will serve Utahns with a better selection of Broadway touring shows. The price tag is between $100 and $120 million though and some people are asking what it will mean for other arts organizations in the city.

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