Jennifer Napier-Pearce

Guest Host, RadioWest

Jennifer Napier-Pearce served as KUER's news director and a guest host of RadioWest. She is no longer with the station.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinkcotton/3913458235/">Janine</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

What do financier Charles Schwab, writer John Irving and actor Orlando Bloom have in common? They all have dyslexia, an oft-misunderstood and chronic condition. Now research into how the brain works is revealing the root causes of reading problems and offering strategies for overcoming them. On Friday, dyslexia expert Dr. Sally Shaywitz joins Jennifer Napier-Pearce for a look into the dyslexic mind.

Asleep

Aug 5, 2011

A century ago, a mysterious epidemic emerged. Patients could not move, yet they were fully aware of everything going on around them. This so-called "sleeping sickness" claimed over a million lives, then disappeared as quickly as it had arrived. On Friday, a look at the pandemic which doctors are still trying to understand.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ddpf/3582526331/">David Pereira</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Breastfeeding is portrayed as the very essence of dedicated motherhood and a protection against all sorts of maladies, from obesity to allergies to even leukemia. Joan B. Wolf isn't buying it. She's not anti-breastfeeding, but she says medical research on the health benefits of breast-milk is inconclusive and the social pressures to breastfeed are often harmful to the mother. On Friday, Wolf joins Jennifer Napier-Pearce to challenge the idea that breast is best.

State of Delaware Digital Archives

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (kuer) - Criminologist and former cop Peter Moskos says America's prisons are broken, overcrowded, unsafe places that rehabilitate no one and impose tremendous personal, social and economic costs. So he suggests a radical alternative: flogging. On Tuesday, Moskos joins Jennifer Napier-Pearce to argue why corporal punishment is a more humane option for justice.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/adisetiawan/2332993278/">Adi Setiawan</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Even as society contemplates the dangers of video games, neuroscientists and psychologists are using virtual reality therapy to treat a whole host of conditions. From post-traumatic stress disorder to burn treatment to stroke, researchers and practitioners are finding that virtual reality can ease pain, both physical and psychological. On Friday, Jennifer Napier-Pearce explores how therapeutic simulations are empowering both doctors and patients.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rosieobeirne/4090198486/">Rosie O'Beirne</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

It's an unpaid, taxing and often thankless job. And it's being performed in nearly one-third of American households: Someone is giving round-the-clock care for an elderly parent or a chronically ill spouse. Author Gail Sheehy has been there and on Friday, she joins Jennifer Napier-Pearce to talk about the challenges, fears and rewards of caregiving.