Moonbird

Feb 10, 2013

Every year, flocks of Rufa red knot shorebirds migrate from the southern tip of Argentina to the Canadian Arctic. That's about 9,000 miles. One extraordinary Rufa, called B95, has traveled that route so many times he has flown the distance to the moon and almost half way back, earning him the nickname "moonbird." But in B95's lifetime, most of the red knot population has disappeared, a decline largely due to human activity. On Monday, the writer Phillip Hoose joins us to talk about the life of B95, which he chronicles in a new book.

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Phillip Hoose is the author of the book Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice, which won the National Book Award, and The Race to Save the Lord God Bird. His new book is called Moonbird: A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95.

Phillip Hoose will be in Salt Lake City this week to talk about his book Moonbird. That event is on Friday, February 15, at 6 p.m. at the King's English Bookshop. Visit the King's English's web site for more details.