Quackery

Jan 30, 2018

Tuesday, we’re talking about some of the weirdest ways we’ve tried to cure our bodies and minds through the ages. Doctor and author Lydia Kang is our guide and she says we still need to be saved from quacks.

Tuesday, we’re talking about some of the weirdest ways we’ve tried to cure our bodies and minds through the ages. Lydia Kang is an internist and co-author of a new book called Quackery. In it, she chronicles things like a 12th-century bird poop potion to aid in childbirth, a 17th-century recipe for blood jam to treat infections, and the 19th-century tapeworm diet fad. Kang joins us to talk about our ongoing search for a cure, and why we still need to be saved from quacks - and ourselves.

PROGRAM NOTE: RadioWest will not air at 7:00 p.m. so we can bring you NPR special coverage of President Donald Trump's State of the Union address.

Lydia Kang is a practicing physician, writer, and poet. Along with Nate Pedersen, she's co-author of  Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything [Indie bookstores|Amazon]