A Social Panic And A Life Cut Short

Aug 7, 2018

In 1989, journalist Alice Tallmadge was dumbfounded when she heard that her niece had recovered memories of a Satanic cult torturing her in grotesque ways. It was part of a hysteria that gripped the nation, and it just wasn’t true.

In 1989, journalist Alice Tallmadge was dumbfounded by the story she heard from her niece, a 21-year-old living in Logan, Utah. Michelle said she had recovered memories of a Satanic cult torturing her in grotesque ways. Tallmadge was also shocked by how quickly the family came to believe that Satanists were at work in their town. It was part of a hysteria that gripped the nation, and just wasn’t true. In a new memoir, Alice Tallmadge explores the real-life consequences of panic and paranoia.

GUEST

Alice Tallmadge is a reporter, writer, and editor. Her new book is called Now I Can See the Moon: A Story of a Social Panic, False Memories, and a Life Cut Short [Indie bookstores|Amazon].