RadioWest Podcasts

Weekdays Live at 9:00 a.m. Mountain / Rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Mountain

A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works.

Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org

  • KUER 90.1  (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.)
  • Streaming at www.kuer.org (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.)
North Star International, Voices of Hope Project, http://bit.ly/2o08ydI

Monday, we’re talking about the delicate balance of being religiously conservative and attracted to the same sex. Ty Mansfield is a family therapist and he’s attracted to men. He’s also married to a woman, has kids, and is a faithful Mormon. Mansfield believes that human sexuality is fluid enough for some gay people - not all - but some to be perfectly happy married to someone of the opposite sex. Mansfield joins us to share his own story, and to talk about what he’s learning about sexuality and happiness.

Ghostland

Mar 31, 2017
The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado is said to be haunted, and inspired Stephen King's novel "The Shining." William Andrus, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2e8rrFw

 

Friday, we’re taking a haunted tour of America with writer Colin Dickey. Don’t worry though, we won’t try to convince you that ghosts or the paranormal are necessarily real. Dickey’s new book explores the bigger cultural questions behind these tales. Traveling to haunted mansions, brothels, industrial ruins, parks, and more, he asks why we tell these stories and how they help us make sense of our world. Dickey joins us to talk about what he calls “an American history in haunted places.” (Rebroadcast)

The Long Walk

Mar 30, 2017
GARY DAVID GOLD FOR OPERA SARATOGA

In his memoir, Brian Castner comes right out and tells you he’s crazy. Castner was the leader of a bomb disposal team in Iraq, a gory, dangerous job. But he never considered what life would be like when he got home. So to try to figure out who that crazy person was, he started writing. His 2012 book is the basis for an opera that’s being performed in Salt Lake City. Thursday, Castner and others join us to talk about the costs of war, and how you make art out of an experience like that.

If you see something evil happening, should you be held accountable if you don’t try to stop it? Legal scholar Amos Guiora’s grandparents were murdered in the Holocaust, and a few years ago he set out on a journey to explore how the Nazi atrocities were allowed to happen. He’s now written a book that looks at not only the moral imperative for bystanders, but the legal obligation to act. Wednesday, Guiora joins Doug to explain why he believes not taking action is criminal.

Ken Lund (http://bit.ly/2oayst8) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Students at Brigham Young University are required to follow strict moral guidelines known as the Honor Code. Most students at the school are prepared to meet the code’s rigid demands, but some aren’t, says Darron Smith, a former BYU professor. Smith says that many black and/or non-Mormon athletes may not fully anticipate the challenges of the Honor Code, and he argues that they’re disproportionately punished for violating it. He’ll join us Tuesday to discuss what happens when race, religion and sports collide.

The Zookeeper's Wife

Mar 27, 2017
from "The Zookeeper's Wife," Focus Features

Monday, the acclaimed naturalist and writer Diane Ackerman talks about the story she uncovered of Jan and Antonina Zabinski, a zookeeper and his wife. The couple ran the Warsaw Zoo during the brutal Nazi occupation of World War II, and they were able to save more than 300 people destined to be exterminated by the Nazis. Ackerman’s book has been made into a film, so we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with her about the role of nature in kindness and savagery. (Rebroadcast)

Fire, water, air, and earth – these are the classical elements of cooking. According to food journalist Michael Pollan, they help us transform stuff from the natural world into delicious food and drink.  But increasingly, cooking isn't done in the home; it’s done by corporations and restaurants, and that’s disconnecting us from the very idea of food and how we eat it. Pollan joins us Friday to talk about his book Cooked, and to explore how this trend affects our planet, our culture, our food, and our health. (Rebroadcast)

James Palinsad (http://bit.ly/2mSdcGv) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Earlier this month, Utah legislators passed a bill that would give the state the strictest DUI law in the country. The Beehive State was the first to lower the legal blood-alcohol content from .1 to .08, and the new law, if signed by Governor Gary Herbert, would further lower that limit to .05. Supporters say doing so will reduce drunk driving and save lives, while opponents worry that the law will hurt restaurants, bars, and the state’s reputation. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides.

In a new book, former manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Pat Mulroy says we’re facing a tough global reality when it comes to water. Growth, urbanization, and the effects of climate change mean we have to find new ways to manage a resource she says most Americans simply take for granted. Mulroy is coming to Utah, and she joins Doug Wednesday to explain what’s at stake, and how creating a shared vision for our water future is more important than ever.

Chris Blakeley (http://bit.ly/2n7rWoC) via CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (http://bit.ly/OJZNiI)

English professor Christopher Newfield spends a lot of time thinking about public higher education. He’s worried about it. America’s public college system, he says, is in a shambles, with students paying higher tuitions for less learning. The conventional thinking is that public sector practices are to blame, but Newfield argues that the increasing privatization of our universities is the real problem. He joins us Tuesday to explain how we wrecked public universities and how we can fix them.

Pages