RadioWest Podcasts

Weekdays Live at 9:00 a.m. Mountain / Rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Mountain

Conversations and stories that explore the way the world works.

Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. KUER 90.1  (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.); Streaming at radiowest.org

American Eclipse

Aug 15, 2017
Étienne Léopold Trouvelot, Public Domain via Wikipedia

With a rare total solar eclipse slated to hit parts of the United States next week, we’re taking the opportunity to talk to science journalist David Baron. In his new book, he tells the story of the 1878 eclipse which had throngs of American scientists racing West to witness and study the celestial phenomenon. Baron is obsessed with eclipses himself, and he joins Doug to talk about how mind-blowing a total solar eclipse can be to both 19th and 21st-century observers.

Devil's Bargain

Aug 14, 2017

To understand Donald Trump’s path to the White House and Hillary Clinton’s downfall, journalist Joshua Green says you have to begin with Steve Bannon. In only a few months, Bannon went from the alt-right powerhouse leading Breitbart News, to the CEO of Trump's campaign, and finally to his current position as White House Chief Strategist. Green joins us Monday to tell Bannon’s story - how a brilliant and charismatic man from the fringe of American politics helped “storm the presidency.”

The First Love Story

Aug 11, 2017
Public domain

Friday, we’re talking about the oldest relationship in the Christian world: Adam and Eve. The writer Bruce Feiler says the two don’t get the credit they deserve, and in his book, he aims to redeem them for a new generation. According to Feiler, the tale of Adam and Eve is a timeless myth that still has much to teach us. They confronted the ultimate human fear—loneliness—and defeated it with the ultimate human expression—love. Feiler joins us to explore the meaning of the first love story. (Rebroadcast)

The "Monkey" Trial

Aug 10, 2017
Smithsonian Institution Archives, siarchives.si.edu

Thursday, we’re telling the story behind the Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925. You know the basics: the agnostic Clarence Darrow and the Bible-thumping William Jennings Bryan faced off in a court room in a battle about teaching evolution in public schools. Our guest is the historian Jeffrey Moran who says the trial came as American culture was shifting and fundamentalists were freaking out about Charles Darwin. It was the trial of the century.

by H. Charles McBarron, Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday, we’re taking a different look at the American Revolutionary War. We think of it as brave patriots fighting for a noble cause, which is true, but in his new book historian Holger Hoock is trying to remind us just how bloody it was. The British brutalized American soldiers; we tortured loyalists. In fact, this cruelty shaped the outcome of the war. Hoock’s book is called Scars of Independence: America’s Violent Birth  and he's joining us to talk about it.

Why Time Flies

Aug 8, 2017

Tuesday, we’re taking a scientific and philosophical look at “time.” If you’ve ever sat through an hour-long meeting that lasted forever, or watched a child grow up in the blink of an eye, you know that time isn’t just a quantifiable measurement. New Yorker science staff writer Alan Burdick says that writing a book about time was actually like “peering into the bottom of existence.” He joins Doug to talk about the clock, our relationship to it, and “Why Time Flies.”

These days, the writer Alexandra Fuller lives in a yurt in Jackson Hole. It’s a far cry from where she grew up: under the cloud of civil war in what was once called Rhodesia in southern Africa. Fuller has chronicled her life in a series of acclaimed memoirs, writing fearlessly about war, family, and the collapse of her decades-long marriage. Her newest book is a novel about two Native American cousins on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. She joins us Monday to talk about her life, her work, and how they overlap.

Overdressed

Aug 4, 2017

Try to imagine 18 tons of clothes. It’s the image journalist and author Elizabeth Cline said surprised her the most while researching her book about the way Americans dress. That’s because that pile represented three-days of donations to one thrift store in one U.S. city. And what’s the impact of the cheap fashion we buy and toss on such a regular basis? Cline is coming to Utah, and Monday she joins Doug to explain what it means for our economy, our environment, and for our culture. (Rebroadcast)

Dream Hoarders

Aug 3, 2017

The scholar Richard Reeves was raised in the U.K., and he hates the sense of class consciousness he says pervades there. That was part of the appeal in becoming an American citizen. In his latest book though, Reeves describes a growing chasm between the upper middle class and the 80% of Americans whose opportunities have stagnated. Reeves joins Doug Thursday to talk about the ways this “favored fifth” is pulling away from the rest of the nation, and what it means for the American dream.

The Gatekeepers

Aug 2, 2017
Public domain

Wednesday, journalist Chris Whipple joins us to talk about what’s been called the toughest job in Washington. White House Chiefs of Staff serves as gatekeepers to the Oval Office, and they help define the course of the country. Whipple interviewed all 17 men still living who have served in the position. Ultimately, he says, their style makes or breaks each presidency. We’ll examine the job’s unique challenges and ask how new chief of staff John Kelly might shake up the current West Wing.

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