RadioWest Podcasts

Weekdays Live at 9:00 a.m. Mountain / Rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Mountain

A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works.

Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org

  • KUER 90.1  (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.)
  • Streaming at www.kuer.org (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.)
Morgan Schmorgan (http://bit.ly/2n76yjB) and Stuart Rankin (http://bit.ly/2mEhOkf) via CC BY-NC 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1jNlqZo) (changes made)

Monday, we’re talking about fake news. You’re hearing that term a lot these days, and it’s being applied to all kinds of media, from articles written by Macedonian teenagers to the work of news outlets like CNN. But what is fake news, and maybe more importantly, what isn’t it? Where does it come from and what effects has it had on our culture? We’ll also talk about the efforts to combat fake news and the challenges of getting people to change their minds about stuff they really want to believe is true.

The Immortal Irishman

Mar 17, 2017

Friday, journalist Timothy Egan joins us to tell the story of Irish revolutionary Thomas Francis Meagher. Egan first encountered Meagher as a statue on the Montana Capitol grounds, but tracing his life took Egan from the brutal occupation of Ireland and the famine which killed a million people, to the fields of America’s civil war and to the American frontier. We’ll talk about Meagher’s transformation from romantic to rebel to leader, and what it reveals about the journey. (Rebroadcast)

Courtesy Photo

Thursday, we’re talking about one of the great classics of American theater, A Streetcar Named Desire. It was 70 years ago when Marlon Brando first played Stanley Kowalski on Broadway, but the themes of sexual violence, homophobia, addiction, and family strife still resonate today. A new production at Salt Lake City’s Grand Theatre opens this week, so we’re exploring Tennessee Williams’ masterpiece and how it’s become, as one guest puts it, enshrined in America’s psyche.

On Trails

Mar 15, 2017
Rich via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/uk4xos, https://goo.gl/xYWc9B

 In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike. [Rebroadcast]

American Nations

Mar 14, 2017
Used with permission: Colin Woodard and Tufts University

You don’t need to be a scholar or veteran political observer to see that America is divided, but journalist and historian Colin Woodard says this is really nothing new. Woodard argues that America has always been divided, because we’re actually eleven distinct regional nations, with different cultures and ideas about how the world works. He’ll join us Tuesday to explain the historic roots of these nations, and how that past is still influencing the country today.

The Science of Fat

Mar 13, 2017
Laura Lewis via Flickr/CC, http://bit.ly/2ix26sf

Body fat is a source of shame for many people, something to be hidden, fought, and burned away. But fat, says the biochemist Sylvia Tara, isn’t just unsightly blubber, it’s an essential and deeply misunderstood organ that’s vital to our existence. It enables our reproductive organs, strengthens our immune system, protects us from disease, and may even help us live longer. In her book, Tara explores the science behind our least appreciated organ, and she joins us Monday to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)

Cassi Gurell (http://tinyurl.com/gn7zt6c) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://tinyurl.com/p4devpc)

Friday, a panel of journalists and legislators join Doug to review 2017 Utah Legislative Session. A lot has happened on Capitol Hill in the past 45 days. Legislators made a number of changes to the state’s liquor laws, including one that gives Utah the nation’s toughest drunk driving law. Deals were struck to address homelessness in Salt Lake. Tax reforms fizzled. Medical marijuana took a step forward. And car inspections could be a thing of the past. We’ll talk about all that, and more.

Courtesy Photo

Thursday, we’re talking about the lives of refugees with the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen. Nguyen came to this country when he was four, and he says there’s a tendency to separate the stories of immigrants from the stories of war. The people who seek refuge here though, he says, often have war stories to tell. Nguyen is in Utah, and joins us to explain what it’s like to be an outsider.

Gage Skidmore (cropped; http://bit.ly/2mgrjqD) via CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Late last week, Congressman Ryan Zinke of Montana took the job of Secretary of the Department of the Interior. As the administrator of roughly a fifth of America’s land, his influence will be widely felt, especially in the West. But who is he? And where does he stand on important issues like state control of public lands, or on the contentious designation of national monuments? Utah Congressman Rob Bishop will be among our guests Wednesday as we examine Zinke’s appointment and what it means for Utah.

William Murphy (http://bit.ly/2lPBwII); CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1dsePQq)

Tuesday, we’re talking about the rise of the Good Food Movement. It’s an ad hoc cultural crusade that has cropped up across America in the past decade, advocating for good food produced in ways that benefit both the land and the people who grow it. And it’s been successful: local, organic, and natural food is now all the rage. The journalist Naomi Starkman has documented the growth of the Good Food Movement. She’s in Salt Lake this week, and she joins us to discuss how food nourishes the body and soul.

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