RadioWest

Weekdays Live at 9:00 a.m. Mountain / Rebroadcast at 7:00 p.m. Mountain

Conversations and stories that explore the way the world works.

Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. KUER 90.1  (9 a.m. and 7 p.m.); Streaming at radiowest.org

Frank Sinatra called Spencer Tracy “The Gray Fox.” Some actors called him “The Pope.” The biographer James Curtis calls Tracy the greatest actor of his generation. Through the years, Tracy’s legacy has faded, eclipsed by that of Katharine Hepburn, one of his great loves. Curtis has written a biography of Tracy that refurbishes his story, detailing his relationship with his wife, Louise, his love affair with Hepburn, his drinking problem and his inimitable acting chops. Curtis joins Doug on Tuesday.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/raychelnbits/4187745579/">Raychel Medez</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

For those trying to make sense of dysfunction in US politics, historian Nancy Cohen has an answer: sex. Cohen argues that a 40-year backlash against the sexual revolution is at the heart of our current political wars, and she’s not just blaming Republican men. She says that Democrats are complicit and that women have been ardent champions of what she calls the counterrevolution. Monday, she’ll take us through the modern history of gender politics and explain what it means for the 2012 election.

Revelations

Apr 26, 2012
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/scotiamade/5114890900/ ">Wry&Ginger</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

For many, The Book of Revelation lays out a terrifying vision for the end of days: war, famine and plague visited on the Earth. Religion scholar Elaine Pagels says that with its symbolic language, the Bible’s final book has been subject to a range of interpretations though. She says it’s about hope as much as fear. Pagels’ latest book is called “Revelations” and Friday she joins us to explain what ancient prophecies can teach us not just about good and evil, but about humankind as a whole.

Scott Winterton | Deseret News

Thursday on RadioWest we're hosting a panel discussion about Utah's recent political caucuses. There's evidence that caucus delegates were more moderate this time around, and that they value experience more than in years past. That may explain why Sen. Orrin Hatch survived the caucus, only to face his first primary since 1976. We'll also talk about the coming congressional race between Rep. Jim Matheson and Republican nominee Mia Love, and what Democrats are doing to woo Utah's Mormon voters. 

Friday, Doug is joined by storyteller and humorist Kevin Kling. Kling is perhaps best known for his commentaries on NPR. His stories are autobiographical - funny, but deeply personal. Kling shares everything from holidays in Minnesota and performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia to living with a birth defect and surviving a near fatal motor cycle accident. He joins Doug to talk about the power of story to overcome tragedy. (Rebroadcast)

 

The past 200 years haven’t been kind to the American buffalo. Once the basis for the cultures and economies of Native Americans on the Great Plains, bison were nearly eradicated in the 19th century. Conservation efforts saved the animals from extinction, but they no longer roam freely on their old range. In a new documentary, the filmmaker Doug Hawes-Davis chronicles the history of human relations with the American bison. He and Western historian Dan Flores join Doug on Tuesday.

Paper Promises

Apr 20, 2012
<i><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/zoliblog/3198088960/">Zoli Erdos</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

For the past 40 years western economies have splurged on debt, but it’s hardly a new phenomenon. Financial journalist Philip Coggan says that economic crises have a time-worn place in history. Governments fall, currencies lose their value and new systems emerge. In his new book, Coggan traces our attitudes towards money and debt through history. Monday, he joins us to explain what these debt cycles can teach us about our current situation and how our attitudes might be about to change again.

Inside Scientology

Apr 19, 2012
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/astroot/4809263036/ ">Aaron Stroot</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Friday, we're talking about Scientology with the journalist Janet Reitman. To its adherents, Scientology is the "fastest growing religion in the world." Its critics though call it a "cult" and even a "mafia" pointing to the hundreds of thousands of dollars that believers can pay for salvation. Reitman spent five years investigating the group and joins us to discuss her book "Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion." (Rebroadcast)

The Book of Love

Apr 18, 2012
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/archer10/2214450463/">Dennis Jarvis</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

When the Hindu philosopher Vatsayana wrote the Kamasutra some 2000 years ago, he said that he did so in a spirit of chastity and meditation – not for the sake of passion. So how is it that the treatise has become synonymous with sexual ecstasy and acrobatic positions? The writer James McConnachie joins us to tell the story of the Kamasutra’s journey from India to Victorian England and the role it has played in the West’s ongoing wars over sexuality and morality.

Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/25968780@N03/4614784650/>dh</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr

Utah's famed powder snow -- snow so great it typically covers local mountains well into the summer -- faces a dim prognosis. Several recent studies suggest spring snowpack in the Mountain West is dwindling, the result of a warming climate. If the predictions hold true, in the future the region will see less snow and more rain from fewer, more intense storms. A panel of guests joins Doug on Wednesday to talk about global warming's toll on the region's snowpack and the potential side effects. 

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