Art

A.O. Scott is a long-time film critic for the New York Times, so it may seem strange that he’s now questioning the value of his work ... what the point of criticism actually is. Scott has written a book arguing that critical thinking informs almost every aspect of artistic creation, of civil action, and of our interactions with each other. In that way, he says, we’re all critics. Scott joins us for a discussion about art, pleasure, beauty, truth, and of course criticism. (Rebroadcast)

Don Quixote

Sep 1, 2017
nicointokio via CC/flickr, http://bit.ly/1Ylc8J2

 

Today, Don Quixote is regarded as one of the most important novels ever written. But when it debuted 400 years ago, Miguel Cervantes’ book was deemed unworthy of serious artistic consideration. Ilan Stavans, a professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, has a profound affection for the tale of don Quixote de la Mancha, and he says the wandering knight’s adventure through life mirrors our own. Stavans joins us Friday to explore how Don Quixote rose to global success and gave rise to modernity. (Rebroadcast)

The film High Noon was a hit when it debuted in 1952, and it remains a revered Hollywood classic. But the tale of a sheriff awaiting a showdown held deeper meaning for screenwriter Carl Foreman. For him, it was a political parable. Communist fear gripped the nation, and Foreman was called before the House Committee on Un-American Activities to answer for his past. Journalist Glenn Frankel has written a book about the making of High Noon and its high-stakes allegory. He joins us Thursday to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)

Wednesday, we’re talking about Julius Caesar. You can probably guess why we’re having the conversation. A New York production of Shakespeare’s work recently caused a stir when the play’s director made Julius Caesar look a lot like Donald Trump. The problem is of course that Caesar gets assassinated. So, we’re talking about Julius Caesar the man, Shakespeare’s play, and the relationship between art and politics.

2017 Summer Reading

Jun 7, 2017

There are a couple of book trends this year that may not come as a surprise: politics is hot and the New Yorker recently declared this a “golden age” for dystopian fiction. Wednesday, we’re gathering Utah booksellers Ken Sanders of Ken Sanders Rare Books, Catherine Weller of Weller Book Works, and Betsy Burton of The King’s English with their recommendations. But it is a summer reading list, so we’ll temper some of that pessimism with poetry and mysteries, children’s books and more.

Public domain

 

If you’ve ever seen paintings by the 15th-century Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. Art historian Gary Schwartz will join us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art. (Rebroadcast)

Everyone has a story, and a good one well told can be captivating. The Moth is a venue for great stories. It has given people around the world a stage for their stories, and its producers and presenters know what it takes to weave a compelling tale. It’s about vulnerability, authenticity, living the story as you tell it, and whisking the audience, however large or small, along for the ride. The Moth is in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, and they’ll join us to explore the art and craft of storytelling.

From book cover, Open Midnight

Monday, our guest is writer and environmental advocate Brooke Williams. Williams spent a year alone verifying maps of the southern Utah desert, where he felt a deep connection to the landscape. He wanted to understand that connection, and found an answer in the imagined story of his ancestor William Williams. Nature and wilderness, he concludes in his book, are part of his DNA. Brooke Williams joins Doug to talk about listening to the “archaic whisper” of the past, and how saving the land can save us. (Rebroadcast)

The film High Noon was a hit when it debuted in 1952, and it remains a revered Hollywood classic. But the tale of a sheriff awaiting a showdown held deeper meaning for screenwriter Carl Foreman. For him, it was a political parable. Communist fear gripped the nation, and Foreman was called before the House Committee on Un-American Activities to answer for his past. Journalist Glenn Frankel has written a book about the making of High Noon and its high-stakes allegory. He joins us Thursday to talk about it.

A production of Shakespeare’s The Two Noble Kinsmen is opening this weekend in Salt Lake, and if you’re intimidated by the Bard’s language, here’s the good news: it’s in modern English. Oregon Shakespeare Festival hired 36 playwrights to rework Shakespeare, among them the University of Utah’s Tim Slover. But here’s the question: after 400 years, should we be messing with William Shakespeare? Doug talks to scholars Daniel Pollack-Pelzner, James Shapiro, and to Slover about “translating” a classic.

Pages