Art

In a run-down commercial block in Salt Lake City, Ralphael Plescia has spent some 50 years making art that tells the story of creation as he understands it. He’s hollowed out tunnels, built narrow bridges over bubbling groundwater, and his sculptures are embedded in the walls. Wednesday, we profile a new short film that asks why Ralphael has made this his life work and what will happen to it when he dies. We’ll also explore other “outsider” Utah artists who bring a unique view to our world.

Photo by Karl Hugh. Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016

Utah Shakespeare Festival is performing Much Ado About Nothing, and we’re using it as an excuse to talk about Shakespeare’s women. Scholar Kate McPherson says few Elizabethan playwrights created female characters as rich as the Bard, and that Much Ado is his most sophisticated play about women. It features Beatrice, a feisty and fearless lady who has forsworn love. McPherson, actor Kim Martin-Cotten, and director David Ivers join us to talk about Beatrice and the challenges and opportunities afforded women in Shakespeare’s world.

Henry V

Aug 25, 2016
Photo by Karl Hugh. Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

Thursday, we’re live at the Utah Shakespeare Festival with a look at the bard’s great history  Henry V. Director Brian Vaughn says the play represents a battle of conscience. Through two earlier works, Shakespeare’s audience knows Prince Hal as a wild and irresponsible young man. But now he has the crown, and must weigh right and wrong to grow into the role of king. We’ll talk about the character, how he’s been portrayed over time, and what the play has to say about leadership and authority.

A Clockwork Orange

Aug 19, 2016

Author Anthony Burgess said his novella A Clockwork Orange should have been forgotten, but because of Stanley Kubrick's film, it seemed destined to live on. It's the story of the barbaric passions of a British teen and the state's attempt to impose a mechanistic morality over his free-will. This weekend, The Salt Lake Film Society is screening the film, so Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with the scholar Andrew Biswell. He joined us to explain why Burgess said the point of the book has been widely misunderstood. (Rebroadcast)

The history of Salt Lake City quintet Quiet Oaks is anything but quiet. Four of the band mates played together in a group that broke up after a falling-out with a frontman. Rather than call it quits, they decided to rebuild as Quiet Oaks, refining their take on classic rock into the sound they’ve always aspired to. Now on the western leg of a 42-show tour across America, Quiet Oaks joins us Wednesday to discuss their music and picking up the pieces to become the band they’ve always wanted.

The Road Not Taken

Jul 22, 2016

“Two roads diverged in a yellow wood . . .” Those are the first words to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken." One hundred years after their publication, Frost’s immortal lines remain unbelievably popular. The poem seems straightforward enough: it's about boldly living outside conformity, right? Wrong, says poetry columnist David Orr. He says nearly everyone hopelessly misreads Frost's poem. Orr joins us Friday as we explore the meaning of "The Road Not Taken" and the history behind it. [Rebroadcast]

Filmmaker Laurie Kahn calls romance fiction a story of pride and prejudice. The genre accounts for a billion dollars in annual sales, and the people who read and write these steamy books are a vast community of educated and savvy women. But despite its wild popularity and economic success, many see romance as nothing more than tawdry, throw-away pulp. Thursday, Kahn and Princeton University’s William Gleason join us to talk about romance’s literary strengths and the people who love the genre.

2016 Summer Reading

Jun 8, 2016
mamamia05 via CC Flickr, https://goo.gl/hxIrav

Summer’s finally here. Time to settle in and read a good book. If you’re not sure what to read, our guests on Wednesday’s show likely have at least one suggestion that’ll pique your interest. Local booksellers Catherine Weller, Ken Sanders, and Betsy Burton have a combined century of experience in the business, so they know how to pair a reader with the right book. They’ll join Doug to talk about their top picks of the season for readers of all tastes and ages.

<a href="https://www.reverbnation.com/connect">Reverb Nation/CONNECT</a>

Rolling Stone has called Ogden-based singer-songwriter Sammy Brue an “Americana prodigy.” He started playing music at 10 years old when he got a guitar for Christmas. He cut his teeth on tunes by Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie, and in two months he was writing his own songs. Well, Sammy’s 15 now. He’s put out an EP record, gained acclaim at music festivals across the country, and signed a record deal with a Nashville label. He’ll join us Thursday to play some music and talk about his budding career.

Local Music: Starmy

Apr 13, 2016

  The band Starmy is a rare thing in the Salt Lake City music scene: a band that lasts. They’ve been around for 14 years, suffered the toll of drugs and alcohol, and endured the pressures of adult life. Despite all that, they’ve managed to put out five full-length records of avant-garde indie rock. Guitarist and vocalist Mike Sartain says Starmy's latest album might its last. He and his band will join us Wednesday to play some music and to talk about the challenges of the ever-changing music industry.

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