Art

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/anitakhart/3677724838/">Anita Hart</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Friday, we're talking about Bach's Cello Suites and the incredible story of how musician Pablo Casals discovered the almost-unknown compositions in a second-hand store. Our guest is the journalist Eric Siblin, a one-time pop music critic who was "struck by musical lightening" when he first heard the Suites in concert. Siblin set out to write a history of The Suites and soon discovered three centuries of politics, intrigue and passion. (Rebroadcast)

Miss Representation

Sep 16, 2011

Monday, Doug is joined by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, director of the film "Miss Representation." This is the latest in our Through the Lens film series. Siebel Newsom's documentary explores how women are portrayed in the media and the very real consequences this has on leadership in our society. Siebel Newsom says her film is meant to be what she calls a "change agent for our culture." It's a change she says will empower women and help America's productivity, creativity and bottom line.

Literary loves, like romantic ones, can be both joyous and painful. The critic Laura Miller was quite young when she met her first love - The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. But the relationship grew troubled when as a skeptical teen she began to learn about CS Lewis' Christian themes. How do you reconcile feelings of literary betrayal when the book was one that shaped who you are? Miller joins Doug to talk about the power of Narnia and the man who created it. (Rebroadcast)

Beethoven's Ninth

Sep 8, 2011

This Friday and Saturday, the Utah Symphony will perform an Beethoven Ninth Symphony under the direction of Maestro Thierry Fischer. We're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation on the story behind the most famous piece of classical music in Western culture. Our guest is the Harvard professor Thomas Forrest Kelly - who says that to appreciate the Ninth Symphony, you have to hear it the way audiences did when it was first performed in Vienna, in 1824.  (Rebroadcast)

Painter Douglas Snow

Sep 1, 2011
V. Douglas Snow, Cockscomb Near Teasdale, 1985, courtesy the Springville Museum of Art collection, 1989.069

Most of us know the paintings of the artist Douglas Snow through his public installations - at the airport and the lobby of the Pioneer Theatre. His pieces are often shocking when you first come upon them and they prompt a strong reaction. That reaction must have delighted Snow, who never created his works to simply blend in. Doug Snow died in 2009 and a retrospective of his work has just opened in Salt Lake City. Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with him about his connection to place. (Rebroadcast)

Utah's Timpanogos Storytelling Festival is this weekend, and Thursday, Doug is joined by featured performer Kevin Kling. Kling is a humorist, perhaps best known for his commentaries on NPR. His stories are autobiographical - funny, but deeply personal. Kling shares everything from holidays in Minnesota and performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia to living with a birth defect and surviving a near fatal motor cycle accident. He joins Doug to talk about the power in story to overcome tragedy.

New Music of 2011

Aug 17, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/guidosportaal/4036379423/">Guido S</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

What new music has grabbed your attention this summer? Wednesday, Doug is joined by Bob Boilen, host of NPR's All Songs Considered. Boilen's bringing along his favorite music (so far) of 2011. There are a few names you've heard and a few that might be new to you. There's alternative music, indie rock and some R&B influence. Of course, there's at least a song or two that's just really hard to put into a category.

Thursday, we're talking about Judy Garland and one performance 50 years ago. We're joined by journalist James Kaplan, whose account of Garland's 1961 Carnegie Hall concert appeared in Vanity Fair. Kaplan says it was part morbid curiosity that packed the house that night. Garland's health and career had been destroyed by alcohol and pills and doctors told her she would never work again. But given the stage and the spotlight, Judy Garland solidified her place in entertainment legend.  (Rebroadcast)

7/22/11: Richard III

Jul 22, 2011
Photo by Karl Hugh / Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2011

Friday, we're broadcasting from Cedar City, where Utah Shakespeare Festival is celebrating it's 50th anniversary. We'll talk to Artistic Directors Brian Vaughn and David Ivers about their vision for the Festival. We'll also explore Shakespeare's complicated character Richard III and ask how he measures against the history's assessment of the last Plantagenet king.

Photo by Karl Hugh. / Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2011

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (kuer) - Thursday on RadioWest, we're live from the Utah Shakespeare Festival in Cedar City. The festival is of course known for performing the works of the bard, but they also stage contemporary plays. This year, the season includes Tennessee Williams' 1944 classic The Glass Menagerie. 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of Williams' birth, and we're taking the opportunity to talk about his life, his plays and his enduring characters.

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