Art

Selma '65

Mar 8, 2016

  Tuesday, we’re profiling a one-woman play from Pygmalion Theatre Company. It’s about two people whose lives collided after the 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights march. Viola Liuzzo was a 39-year-old mother who stood with civil rights activists. Tommy Rowe was an FBI informant who was with Klan members when they overtook Liuzzo’s car and shot her. Playwright Catherine Filloux and actor Tracie Merrill join us to talk about Selma ’65 and the people Filloux calls “two lost souls of the South.”

Don Quixote

Mar 4, 2016
nicointokio via CC/flickr, http://bit.ly/1Ylc8J2

Today, Don Quixote is regarded as one of the most important novels ever written. But when it debuted 400 years ago, Miguel Cervantes’ book was deemed unworthy of serious artistic consideration. Ilan Stavans, a professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, has a profound affection for the tale of don Quixote de la Mancha, and he says the wandering knight’s adventure through life mirrors our own. Stavans joins us Friday to explore how Don Quixote rose to global success and gave rise to modernity. [Rebroadcast]

Back in 1979, local filmmaker Trent Harris documented a strange series of events. It started when he met “Groovin’ Gary,” who led him to a talent show in Beaver, which inspired him to make three films. The Beaver Trilogy became a cult classic, and questions have surrounded it since its release. Just who was “Groovin’ Gary,” and what happened to him after the talent show? In a new film, director Brad Besser investigates the mystery behind The Beaver Trilogy. He joins us Thursday to talk about it.

The Road Not Taken

Feb 5, 2016

 

“Two roads diverged in a yellow wood . . .” Those are the first words to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken." One hundred years after their publication, Frost’s immortal lines remain unbelievably popular. The poem seems straightforward enough: it's about boldly living outside conformity, right? Wrong, says poetry columnist David Orr. He says nearly everyone hopelessly misreads Frost's poem. Orr joins us Friday as we explore the meaning of "The Road Not Taken" and the history behind it. [Rebroadcast]

Filmmaker Robert Greene thought for years about a documentary on Christine Chubbuck, a Florida news reporter who committed suicide on live television in 1974. What he didn’t want to do though was make a straight-forward movie about a depressed woman. So Greene proposed an unorthodox approach to actress Kate Lyn Sheil. The film crew would follow Sheil as she prepared to take on the tragic role of Christine. Tuesday, Greene joins Doug to talk about performance, authenticity, and storytelling.

Gwendal Uguen via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1f2IiYL

Witch weighing, African swallows, a bloodthirsty bunny, God himself… We’re talking of course about Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Sure, the movie is epically silly, but behind the humor lay countless cultural and historical references. According to BYU film studies professor Darl Larsen, in crafting their 1975 cult-classic film the Pythons drew from Arthurian legend, the Medieval period, and the hard times of 1970s Great Britain. Larsen joins us Friday for something completely different. (Rebroadcast)

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar says it’s hard to stealthily spy when you’re 7’2”. But to excel in the NBA he needed to understand his opponents, so he took a page from Sherlock Holmes. He watched players’ habits and listened to ball boys to catch gossip that revealed weaknesses. Abdul-Jabbar started reading Holmes stories in 1969, and they influenced his life and career. Now he’s written his own novel from the perspective of Mycroft Holmes. Abdul-Jabbar joins us Wednesday to talk about his life as a Holmesian. (Rebroadcast)

The National Parks

Dec 28, 2015
Justin Hackworth, http://justinhackworth.com/

Monday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with the National Parks. No, we’re not talking about Zion, Arches, and Bryce Canyon. The National Parks are a Provo-based band whose debut album tilted to the folksy side of indie rock. Their newest release features a beefed-up indie-pop sound inspired by the energy of performing live. The band members say it took a leap of faith to explore new musical ground, leading them to discover what can happen when you pursue your passion without any limits. [Rebroadcast]

Image by Katherine H via flickr, http://bit.ly/1eRt01k

Christmas day has finally arrived, a day for gifts and giving. We're hoping you can finally put the busy-ness and commercial hubbub of the season aside and settle in to enjoy our gift to you. Friday on RadioWest, we've got two great holiday stories: Truman Capote's "A Christmas Memory" and Ron Carlson's "H Street Sledding Record." (Rebroadcast)

A Christmas Carol

Dec 24, 2015

 

In the fall of 1843, Charles Dickens was in something of a mid-life crisis. His marriage was troubled, his career tottering, his finances on the verge of collapse. He even considered giving up writing. He didn’t, of course. Instead, he wrote his most famous work, A Christmas Carol, in just six weeks, and then self-published it. As the historian and writer Les Standiford notes, Dickens’ famous Christmas tale didn’t just change his life, it reinvented the way we celebrate the holiday. We’ll talk with Standiford about A Christmas Carol on Thursday. (Rebroadcast)

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