Culture

Culture, Ideas, Religion

Overdressed

May 15, 2017

Try to imagine 18 tons of clothes. It’s the image journalist and author Elizabeth Cline said surprised her the most while researching her book about the way Americans dress. That’s because that pile represented three-days of donations to one thrift store in one U.S. city. And what’s the impact of the cheap fashion we buy and toss on such a regular basis? Cline is coming to Utah, and Monday she joins Doug to explain what it means for our economy, our environment, and for our culture.

Josh Ewing, Utah Dine Bikeyah

A coalition of five sovereign Native American tribes was instrumental in last year’s declaration of Bears Ears National Monument. Those tribes all lived in the region long before white settlers, and tribal members say they depend on the Bears Ears for food, shelter, healing, and spiritual sustenance. For them, the landscape is alive. It has a heartbeat. It’s a valued member of the family. Tuesday, we'll talk about how Native Americans think about and relate to Bears Ears.

Roco Julie (no changes; http://bit.ly/2lH52E2) (CC BY-SA 2.0, http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw)

A funny thing happened on the way to digital utopia: we rekindled our love affairs with the very analog goods and ideas that tech gurus insisted we no longer needed. What once looked outdated—stuff like paper notebooks, LP records, and board games—is cool again, breathing new life into many businesses that deal in tangible things. The writer David Sax calls this trend the “Revenge of Analog.” In a new book, he explores the real things renaissance, and he’ll join us to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)

When novelist Ella Joy Olsen set out to write her first book, she wanted a topic close to home. And what could be more tangible then the walls surrounding her? Olsen’s first book is an imagined genealogy of her house, exploring the lives of five women who occupied the same space over a century. We’re using Olsen’s work as a jumping off point to talk about how the history of our houses effects the way we live in them today.

Ali Noorani says America’s debate over immigration isn’t just a political issue, it’s a cultural one. Noorani directs the National Immigration Forum, and he says at the heart of the debate is fear about jobs, security, and our identity as a nation. So, Noorani set out to look for solutions not in the halls of government, but in churches, businesses, and communities across the country. Noorani is in Utah this week; he’ll join us to talk about meeting the challenge of American immigration.

Marketing professor Adam Alter begins his new book by noting that Steve Jobs didn’t let his own children use an iPad, a product he invented, because he was worried they’d get addicted to it. That’s what Alter’s book is about: our increasing addiction to technology. These days, we aren’t just hooked on substances, like drugs and alcohol. We’re addicted to video games, social media, porn, email, and lots more. Alter joins us Monday to explore the business and psychology of irresistible technologies.

The psychologist Alison Gopnik is worried about modern day parenting, including her own. It’s too much like being a carpenter, she says, where you shape chosen materials into a final, preconceived product. Kids don’t work like that. In her latest book, Gopnik suggests parents think less like carpenters and more like gardeners: creating safe, nurturing spaces in which children can flourish. Gopnik joins us Wednesday to discuss how we can raise better kids by changing our approach to parenting. (Rebroadcast)

Steve Henke; c/o Foodworks, Inc.

Tuesday, we’re talking to global gourmand Andrew Zimmern. As the host of the TV program Bizarre Foods, he’s explored the culture and foods of more than 150 countries. The gimmick of his show, as he’s said, is a fat, white Jew from New York going around the world eating weird stuff. But he hopes that the strange stories he tells inspire people to “stop practicing contempt prior to investigation.” Zimmern is in Utah this week, and he’ll join us to discuss his life, travels, and love of food.

Public domain

One hundred years ago, America entered the First World War. It was sparked by one of history’s most notorious wrong turns. That single blunder ignited a conflict that would claim more than 37 million casualties and sow the seeds of geopolitical strife for generations to come. This week, the PBS program American Experience is airing a three-part examination of WWI. Podcast host Dan Carlin appears in the program, and he joins us Monday to discuss the war’s outbreak and its place in history.

When Larry Cesspooch returned from the Vietnam War, his family told him to “go into the Sundance and wipe yourself off.” Cesspooch is a member of the Ute Indian Tribe, and cleansing ceremonies are a deep part of Native American warrior traditions. Now, with suicides accounting for more US military deaths than combat, people are looking for ways to deal with the horrors of PTSD. Friday, our conversation with director Taki Telonidis about his film exploring how these traditions could help our veterans. (Rebroadcast)

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