Culture

Culture, Ideas, Religion

On Trails

Jul 24, 2017
Rich via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/uk4xos, https://goo.gl/xYWc9B

When he was hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike. (Rebroadcast)

Nowadays, all kinds of devices exist to help us find our way through the world. But before all that stuff, before even cartography, humankind navigated with nature as the guide. The adventurer Tristan Gooley is committed to recovering and teaching the lost arts of natural navigation. He sees compass hands everywhere he looks: in rocks, trees, grass, ducks, puddles, clouds, and the wind. Gooley joins us to share what he’s learned about natural navigation and the joys of learning nature’s subtle signs. [Rebroadcast]

We’re live Wednesday morning, talking about Millennials and Mormonism. Religion scholar Jana Riess has been studying what she calls “The Next Mormons,” and while nearly all say they believe in God, the way they practice their religion is very different from older generations. And like other faiths around the country, the LDS Church is experiencing its share of young adults leaving the fold. We’ll talk with Riess and others about this generational shift, and what it means for Mormonism.

Steve Jurvetson via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2vvx5bp

Robots have been displacing human workers since the dawn of the industrial revolution, and that’s not about to change. If anything, says the futurist Martin Ford, the accelerating pace of tech innovation means that robots will be taking more jobs, including some we thought couldn’t be automated. White-collar workers like paralegals, journalists, even teachers, may soon find themselves replaced by artificial intelligence. Ford joins us Tuesday to explain what the rise of the robots means for the future of work.

Words on the Move

Jul 14, 2017
Tama Leaver via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/1mhaR6e, http://bit.ly/2gMBl1m

 

If you’re worried that the word “literally” now means “figuratively,” or if you fret that acronyms are replacing actual words, today’s show will do one of two things: make you pull out your hair, or it’ll change your mind. The linguist John McWhorter says that changes to the English language are nothing new. Language, he says, isn’t some static thing that just is, “it’s actually something always becoming.” McWhorter will join us to discuss how languages evolve and why we should embrace the changes. (Rebroadcast)

Wheeler Copperthwaite via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2szlOWg

The journalist Sam Quinones has called opiate addiction “the closest thing to enslavement that we have in America today.” It’s a scourge fueled by pharmaceutical companies and drug cartels, and it takes advantage of some heavy cultural baggage on either side of the border. Poor people in Mexico are looking for a leg up, while disaffected people in the world’s richest country just want to check out. Quinones joins us Monday to discuss the culture of the opiate epidemic.

When novelist Ella Joy Olsen set out to write her first book, she wanted a topic close to home. And what could be more tangible than the walls surrounding her? Olsen’s first book is an imagined genealogy of her house, exploring the lives of five women who occupied the same space over a century. We’re using Olsen’s work as a jumping off point to talk about how the history of our houses effects the way we live in them today. (Rebroadcast)

Mormons and Sex

Jun 29, 2017

Thursday, we’re talking about Mormons and sex. LDS therapist Jennifer Finlayson-Fife says that Mormon theology of the body is very different from many Christian traditions. Within marriage, sex isn’t just for procreation, but also for pleasure, intimacy and becoming god like. So, what’s the disconnect in a culture where there seems to be so much shame and guilt around sexuality? She’ll join us live, along with LDS sex therapist Kristin Hodson and Chris Duce of the “Celestial Sex” podcast.

Courtesy Steven Barclay Agency

Food and nature writer Michael Pollan says his literary heroes led him astray when he first planted a garden. Theoreau and Emerson had taught him that wilderness is the ultimate form of nature. So, he skipped the fence, only to find himself in a gruesome battle with a woodchuck over the vegetables. Pollan is coming to Utah, and Wednesday, he joins Doug to talk about practical relationships with nature, his journey as a writer about food culture, and his latest interest, psychedelic consciousness.

Nobody Speak

Jun 26, 2017

Monday, we're talking about what happens when the right to privacy comes up against a free press. Director Brian Knappenberger's film uses as a case study the trial over Hulk Hogan's sex tape. With the funding of an internet billionaire, Hogan sued and ruined the online tabloid Gawker. It’s a tawdry story, but the film explores the ways big money can silence the media. It’s called Nobody Speak. (Rebroadcast)

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