Culture

Culture, Ideas, Religion

Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsiao/1297783878/">Derrick S.</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">Creative Commons</a> via flickr

College sports have become big business. Some schools earn $40 to $80 million from their football programs. In a recent article in The Atlantic, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch says it's a tragedy that student-athletes who attract that money don't get any of it. And he derides the NCAA's concepts of "amateurism" and the "student-athlete" as cynical hoaxes. Branch joins Doug on Monday to talk about the shame of college sports, and Sports Illustrated's Seth Davis offers a rebuttal.

Wednesday, we're joined by the Darger family for a conversation about the inner workings of a real polygamist family. The Dargers are Joe, Alina and Vicki who have been married for 21 years and Valerie who became Joe's third wife 11 years ago. All four were raised in polygamous families, and as adults made the choice to live in what they refer to as the "Principle." We'll talk to them about the marriage arrangement they say is inspired by their faith and personal decision.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/a_sorense/3489209778/">Andrew Sorensen</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

The “Star-Spangled Banner” is a song about war and resolve that began life as a drinking tune. We sing it all the time, but often struggle to sing it correctly.  Even professional musicians sometimes butcher our anthem. In a time of uncertainty about national unity, the anthem is one of the few things that can get thousands of Americans to stand up as one.  Guest host Matthew LaPlante looks at the song's complicated history and how it stacks up against other national anthems.

Among the Truthers

Sep 12, 2011

Journalist Jonathan Kay says that a vast conspiracist subculture is spreading like wildfire through North America. Kay spent two years trying to understand the people who adhere to incredible theories on everything from 9/11 and Barack Obama's birth to vaccines. Monday, he joins Doug to explain what he's learned about these "truthers," and why they may be doing real damage to the unity and health of our society. (Rebroadcast)

Tuesday on RadioWest the historian Will Bagley is with us to talk about his epic quest to chronicle the westward migration of American settlers. Bagley's book tells the story of the Overland Trails that brought more than half a million Americans to the far West of Oregon and California. It's the story of families and fortune hunters and the effect that all of it had the native people who for centuries had already been calling the West home. (Rebroadcast)

Farm City

Sep 5, 2011

Monday, we're talking about urban farming with the writer Novella Carpenter. Carpenter sometimes hears from people that they're moving to the country to farm. She said the problem is you get great food, but you don't have anyone to share it with. Carpenter wanted to farm and stay in her community - a very urban neighborhood in Oakland, California. Novella Carpenter joins Doug to talk about her book "Farm City." (Rebroadcast)

Far Between

Aug 18, 2011

Last month, filmmaker Kendall Wilcox made a bold decision. He decided it was the right time for him to admit publically that he is gay. Of course, this process can be difficult for anyone, but Wilcox is an employee of the LDS Church, he teaches at Brigham Young University and he's a producer for BYUTV. Now, he's in the process of making a film that explores the tension between faith and sexual identity. Thursday, Wilcox joins Doug to talk about being "Far Between."

Rebirth

Aug 16, 2011

We're continuing our documentary film series "Through the Lens" with director and producer Jim Whitaker. Whitaker is the creator of Rebirth, a film that captures a "living history" of September 11. It follows the journey of five people directly affected by the tragedy - a sort of time lapse of their grief, their memories and their path to recovery. Whitaker joins Doug on Tuesday and we'll screen the film Thursday night.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/11707873@N00/3962403269/">Rachel</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Tuesday, we're talking about the complicated and sometimes contradictory relationships we have with animals. Take rodents for example. Some people may keep them as pets. Some may set out spring traps to catch them. What about eating a rat? We wouldn't think of it here in the US, but why not? It's eaten elsewhere in the world. Our guest for the hour is Psychology Professor Hal Herzog and he joins us to explain why it's so hard for us to think straight about animals.

Secrets & Wives

Aug 4, 2011

Thursday, we're joined by the author of a new book on polygamy in America. The British journalist Sanjiv Bhattacharya says he's long been obsessed with religion but when he moved to the United States he knew very little about polygamy. He set out to learn about the 40,000 some fundamentalists that are associated with the practice. We'll talk to him about that journey and about the very complex world that he discovered.

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