News

State, National and World News

 Doug Fabrizio talks to Western journalists on their return from the devastation left behind by Hurricane Katrina. He's joined in studio by NPR's rural affairs correspondent Howard Berkes, and Tucson author Charles Bowden who is writing for GQ magazine.

Image by <a href="http://bit.ly/14w74rv">Glenn Halog</a> via Flickr

Investigative journalist Radley Balko says that American police forces have become more like armies than keepers of the peace. He traces it back to the creation of SWAT teams in the 60s, which led to increased use of military tactics and weapons. These days, there are some 50,000 raids each year as part of "wars" declared on drugs and crime. Balko joins Doug to talk about how law enforcement has changed throughout history and what militarized police forces mean for citizens. (Rebroadcast)

Photo credit MROBENALT via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1uQonyr

Thursday, we’re talking about the fight to force Alta Ski Area to open its slopes to snowboarders. Once banned at ski resorts across the country, snowboarding is now outlawed at just three, two of them in Utah. A suit filed earlier this year against Alta claims the resort discriminates against snowboarders. As both sides wait for a U.S. District Court judge to rule, we’ll explore the differences between skiing and snowboarding, and we want to hear from you. Is there a good reason to restrict a resort to skiers only?

Gage Skidmore via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1kENcg4

Over the weekend, rancher Cliven Bundy told a political gathering in St. George that God instructed him to “disarm” federal law enforcement agents when they tried to confiscate his cattle in April. We’re talking with Bundy on Wednesday about his controversial actions and about how his Mormon faith and heritage inform his political views. The journalist Scott Carrier will also join us to examine where Bundy and his self-styled freedom-fighter compatriots fit on the spectrum of political dissent.

Wednesday, we’re discussing the legal allegations against former-Utah Attorneys General Mark Shurtleff and John Swallow. Both were arrested Tuesday morning and charged with multiple felony counts. Shurtleff says the accusations against him are politically motivated and masterminded by Salt Lake County's District Attorney. Both he and Swallow maintain their innocence. A panel of journalists will join us to talk about the cases against Swallow and Shurtleff and to review the story leading up to their arrest. 

Ordain Women

Earlier this week, Mormon feminist Kate Kelly was excommunicated from the LDS Church. Leaders in her former Virginia ward said her ongoing effort to secure women's ordination to the all-male priesthood constituted "conduct contrary to the laws and order of the Church." Wednesday, we're asking what her excommunication means, not just for Kelly personally, but for all women and activists in the LDS Church. Kelly will join Doug. He'll also talk to Mormon commentator Neylan McBaine and historian Amanda Hendrix-Komoto.

<a href="http://bit.ly/U4ei46">Micah Sheldon</a>, CC via Flickr

Tuesday, we're continuing our conversation on discipline and excommunication in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Doug's guest for the hour is Ally Isom, Senior Manager of Public Affairs with the LDS Church. Two high-profile, progressive Mormon activists have been called before their local leaders and are being threatened with excommunication. It's raised a lot of questions about what makes a faithful Mormon, the disciplinary process and what all this reveals about the modern LDS Church.

Last week, two prominent voices in the progressive Mormon community were notified they face possible excommunication from the LDS Church. John Dehlin is creator of a popular podcast discussing Mormon issues and an advocate for LGBT rights. Kate Kelly is founder of Ordain Women, the group seeking access to the all-male priesthood. Monday, Doug sits down with each to talk about what excommunication would mean to them personally and the reaction they've been getting from their communities.

Over the weekend, a rally was held in Salt Lake to draw attention to the renegotiated working agreement between the Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret News. The rally’s organizers, including Utah State Senator Jim Dabakis, allege the News is trying to “strangle” its longtime partner and competitor. Representatives from the News say they’re devoted to “multiple editorial voices.” Dabakis join us Tuesday as we take another look at the relationship between Utah’s two largest newspapers.

Photo by Ken Piorkowski via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/1th4Why

A recent botched prisoner execution in Oklahoma has poured new fuel on the fiery debate surrounding capital punishment in America. For some people, the pain of the punishment should approach that of the crime. For others, the death penalty is a reprehensible and frequently mishandled State endorsement of killing. Wednesday, we’ll hear from both sides of the debate, and ask this question: If America is going to execute criminals, could we be going about it a better way?

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