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Wednesday, we’re discussing the legal allegations against former-Utah Attorneys General Mark Shurtleff and John Swallow. Both were arrested Tuesday morning and charged with multiple felony counts. Shurtleff says the accusations against him are politically motivated and masterminded by Salt Lake County's District Attorney. Both he and Swallow maintain their innocence. A panel of journalists will join us to talk about the cases against Swallow and Shurtleff and to review the story leading up to their arrest. 

Ordain Women

Earlier this week, Mormon feminist Kate Kelly was excommunicated from the LDS Church. Leaders in her former Virginia ward said her ongoing effort to secure women's ordination to the all-male priesthood constituted "conduct contrary to the laws and order of the Church." Wednesday, we're asking what her excommunication means, not just for Kelly personally, but for all women and activists in the LDS Church. Kelly will join Doug. He'll also talk to Mormon commentator Neylan McBaine and historian Amanda Hendrix-Komoto.

<a href="http://bit.ly/U4ei46">Micah Sheldon</a>, CC via Flickr

Tuesday, we're continuing our conversation on discipline and excommunication in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Doug's guest for the hour is Ally Isom, Senior Manager of Public Affairs with the LDS Church. Two high-profile, progressive Mormon activists have been called before their local leaders and are being threatened with excommunication. It's raised a lot of questions about what makes a faithful Mormon, the disciplinary process and what all this reveals about the modern LDS Church.

Last week, two prominent voices in the progressive Mormon community were notified they face possible excommunication from the LDS Church. John Dehlin is creator of a popular podcast discussing Mormon issues and an advocate for LGBT rights. Kate Kelly is founder of Ordain Women, the group seeking access to the all-male priesthood. Monday, Doug sits down with each to talk about what excommunication would mean to them personally and the reaction they've been getting from their communities.

Over the weekend, a rally was held in Salt Lake to draw attention to the renegotiated working agreement between the Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret News. The rally’s organizers, including Utah State Senator Jim Dabakis, allege the News is trying to “strangle” its longtime partner and competitor. Representatives from the News say they’re devoted to “multiple editorial voices.” Dabakis join us Tuesday as we take another look at the relationship between Utah’s two largest newspapers.

Photo by Ken Piorkowski via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/1th4Why

A recent botched prisoner execution in Oklahoma has poured new fuel on the fiery debate surrounding capital punishment in America. For some people, the pain of the punishment should approach that of the crime. For others, the death penalty is a reprehensible and frequently mishandled State endorsement of killing. Wednesday, we’ll hear from both sides of the debate, and ask this question: If America is going to execute criminals, could we be going about it a better way?

Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy hasn't paid his grazing fees in 20 years, and supporters see it as an act of civil disobedience protesting BLM policy and federal ownership of the land where he grazes cattle. But when agents arrived to impound his herd earlier this month, Bundy answered with 1,000 protestors – including armed militia from around the country. Wednesday, we're talking about the standoff: who was there, why they showed up, and what it means for the ongoing debate over public lands in the West.

Friday, we’re examining the recent oral arguments in the ongoing court battle over same-sex marriage in Utah. As the case of Kitchen v. Herbert moves through the judicial process, the legal arguments coming from the plaintiffs and defendants have evolved, and judges on the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals had tough questions for both sides. We’ll pick the arguments apart with the help of a panel of legal experts and try to figure out what will happen with the case in the coming weeks and months.

Photo Phiend via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/1mJdZXM

Wednesday, we’re talking with political commentator Norm Ornstein. He’s in Utah this week to speak at Weber State University, which gives us an excuse to get his thoughts on America’s current political climate. Unfortunately, his forecast isn’t reassuring. We’ll talk with him about the dour prospects for President Obama’s second term, the departure of prominent Congressional problem solvers, and the possible implications of a GOP takeover of the Senate. Political junkies, this show’s for you.

Katherine Hitt via Flickr CC, http://bit.ly/NhEDbP

Monday, we’re examining Utah’s evolving legal case against gay marriage and the focus on child welfare in the State's latest brief to the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. Observers note that Utah has dropped the argument that marriage is about creating children and is now focusing on the idea that children fare best in families with a mother and a father. Doug talks to guests about the State's strategy and what research is telling us about the outcomes of children in same-sex families.

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