Profiles

2013 (c) HBO

Tim Hetherington preferred "image-maker" over photographer to describe what he did in war zones. He wanted to capture personal moments in the midst of chaos, and the result was stunning work as seen in the documentary "Restrepo." But weeks after attending the Oscars with the film, Hetherington was killed by mortar fire in Libya. In trying to understand the tragic death, his co-producer Sebastian Junger found himself making a documentary. It's a deeply personal project, and on Friday we're rebroadcasting a conversation we had earlier this year with Junger and producer James Brabazon. We talked about Hetherington's work and the job of journalists in war. (Rebroadcast)

Friday, Doug is live with filmmakers Sarah Burns and David McMahon for a conversation about their new PBS documentary "The Central Park Five." In 1989, a white woman was brutally raped and beaten in New York's Central Park. Five black and Latino teens from Harlem were pilloried by the press and convicted by the criminal justice system. But then in 2002, the real rapist confessed and DNA evidence helped exonerate the five men. Next week, we're screening the film as part of our Through the Lens documentary series.

 

Wednesday, we're talking to the writer Cheryl Strayed about her memoir "Wild." Strayed was 22-years-old when her mother died of cancer, and she says the loss brought her to a "most savage self." Her marriage was falling apart, she was sleeping with other men and was using heroin. She needed healing, and she found it on a grueling, 1100 mile solo hike on the Pacific Crest Trail. Strayed will be in Utah this weekend and she joins Doug to talk about facing her demons and finding her way back.

The Hour of Peril

Feb 15, 2013
Harper's Magazine, March 9, 1861

Monday, we're telling the astonishing story of a plot to kill Abraham Lincoln on the way to his first inaugural. Our guest is biographer Daniel Stashower, who says the President-elect hadn't even left Illinois when the threats started to arrive. In 1861, it was hard for Lincoln to believe that political hatred could lead to murder. Legendary detective Allan Pinkerton believed though and it was his team of operatives that raced to thwart the "Baltimore Plot."

The First Muslim

Feb 4, 2013

The journalist Lesley Hazleton says that early sources on the prophet Muhammad are infuriatingly vague. He’s described as “neither tall nor short,” “neither dark nor fair,” and “neither thin nor stout.” Hazleton, a longtime Middle East reporter and an agnostic Jew, wanted to understand the man whose legacy continues to shape our world. Her new biography is called “The First Muslim,” and Tuesday, she joins Doug to explain how a man from humble beginnings rose to be the voice and leader of his people.

2013 (c) HBO

  Tim Hetherington preferred "image-maker" over photographer to describe what he did in war zones. He wanted to capture personal moments in the midst of chaos, and the result was stunning work as seen in the documentary "Restrepo." But weeks after attending the Oscars with the film, Hetherington was killed by mortar fire in Libya. In trying to understand the tragic death, his co-producer Sebastian Junger found himself making a documentary. It's part of Sundance, and Wednesday, Junger and producer James Brabazon join Doug to talk about Hetherington's work and the job of journalists in war.

Sundance 2013: Anita

Jan 18, 2013

Anita Hill was a young law professor in 1991 when the Senate Judiciary Committee invited her to testify about the behavior of then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Hill shared a difficult story of sexual harassment by her former boss, but the all-male committee was hostile in its interrogation and Hill was publically attacked for being a liar and a man-hater. Monday, Doug sits down with Anita Hill and filmmaker Freida Mock to talk about the Sundance documentary called "Anita" and about how Hill's experience changed gender politics in America.

Love, An Index

Jan 1, 2013

Three years ago, the award-winning poet Craig Arnold went missing in Japan. Few clues were ever found, leaving his family and his longtime partner, the poet Rebecca Lindenberg, to conclude the worst. Lindenberg has written a new book of poetry, an extended elegy really, to Arnold. As poets, words and conversation united Arnold and Lindenberg, and she says that writing the poems in her new book helped her both continue the conversation and let it go. Tuesday, Lindenberg joins us to talk about her poems and the man they memorialize. (Rebroadcast)

Pioneer Prophet

Dec 28, 2012

When historian John Turner decided to write a book about Mormonism, it didn't take him long to settle on Brigham Young as his object of study. Turner says that the LDS Church's second leader was a colossal figure not just in American religion, but also in the history of politics and westward expansion.  His new biography reveals a complicated man: blunt, aggressive and sometimes profane, but also charismatic and a fierce protector of his people. Friday, Turner joins us to talk about the "Pioneer Prophet." (Rebroadcast)

Frank Sinatra called Spencer Tracy “The Gray Fox.” Some actors called him “The Pope.” The biographer James Curtis calls Tracy the greatest actor of his generation. Through the years, Tracy’s legacy has faded, eclipsed by that of Katharine Hepburn, one of his great loves. Curtis has written a biography of Tracy that refurbishes his story, detailing his relationship with his wife, Louise, his love affair with Hepburn, his drinking problem and his inimitable acting chops. (Rebroadcast)

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