Profiles

Lost in Shangri-La

Aug 19, 2011

Doug talks to Mitchell Zuckoff, author of the book Lost in Shangri-La. In 1945, a site seeing plane of American soldiers crashed in a remote, mysterious valley in Dutch New Guinea. The local tribe was rumored to be head-hunters and had never before been in contact with white people. But the three survivors were caught between the valley and the Japanese enemy. Zuckoff joins us to tell the story of the time they spent with the Dani tribesmen and the daring rescue that brought them home. (Rebroadcast)

Area 51

Aug 11, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/hufferstl/3268194987/" target="_blank">Matt Huff</a>/<a href=" http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Doug talks to journalist Annie Jacobsen about the mysterious Area 51. As Jacobsen reports it, you don't really need aliens to make the story of cold war experiments sound very strange. Based on interviews and declassified documents, Jacobsen explores how the government has pushed the boundaries of science with nuclear testing, top secret supersonic jets and other technology still being used today. Don't worry though - there's still a flying disc, a crash landing and bizarre pilots. (Rebroadcast)

Better This World

Aug 10, 2011

At the 2008 Republican National Convention, two young Texas men were arrested on domestic terrorism charges. They were caught with homemade bombs and the FBI stepped in to prevent the threat they saw to lives and property. A new film follows the case, and asks these questions: were the men misled by a role model turned FBI informant or were they making their own wrong choices all along? "Better This World" will screen in Salt Lake next week and Wednesday the directors join Doug for a look at our post-9/11 America.

When 20-year-old Everett Ruess vanished in the Utah desert in 1934, he left behind a mystery that has puzzled historians and adventurers ever since. In 2009, writer David Roberts made headlines when he announced he had found Ruess' body while on assignment for National Geographic Adventure. Further DNA tests disproved the theory though and Ruess was lost again. Roberts has written a new book and he joins us to talk about the Everett Ruess he did find in the young man's writing, art and legend.

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