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If you’ve ever seen paintings by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, you’ve probably wondered what they mean and what kind of person could have imagined such fanciful scenes. Problem is, we know very little about Bosch’s personal story. That leaves the paintings, which present their own puzzles. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Bosch’s death, and Monday, art historian Gary Schwartz joins us to discuss the fearless artist’s life and his inventive art.

KUER News

When Governor Gary Herbert appointed Spencer Cox as Utah’s Lieutenant Governor in 2013, his communications team suggested that Cox edit his bio. They wanted him to take out the part about being in a rock band. But Spencer Cox says that’s what’s wrong with politicians. They’re so worried about re-election, they’re afraid to say “I play the bass.” Monday, Cox joins Doug to talk about unconventional political choices, his 100-mile commute, and why he’s still rockin’ bass lines with his band UpSide.

Jonathan Barkat

Laurie Rubin has been blind since birth, and she says people imagine her world to be a dark place. But the accomplished mezzo-soprano and lyricist experiences color all around her. She says yellow is an afternoon when birds are singing; green is her backyard; blue is an early morning or the key of G. Rubin is performing in Park City this weekend, and Thursday, she joins Doug to talk about growing up blind, learning to navigate the world, and dreaming in color.

Custer's Trials

Jul 28, 2016

Even in his lifetime, George Armstrong Custer was controversial. He was ambitious and flamboyant as well as courageous and talented. Though largely remembered for his death at the Little Bighorn, T.J. Stiles' paints a fuller picture of Custer's colorful and complicated life. Stiles says Custer lived at a “frontier in time.” He helped usher in the modern American era, but couldn't quite adapt to the modernity he helped create. Stiles joins us Thursday to talk about his book "Custer's Trials." (Rebroadcast)

Trump and Me

Jul 12, 2016

In 1996, New Yorker staff writer Mark Singer was assigned a profile of Manhattan businessman Donald Trump, and it wasn’t long before Singer realized this was no ordinary subject. The piece has been called one of the best pre-campaign portraits of Trump there is, but Trump wasn’t impressed. He wrote Singer a note to call him A TOTAL LOSER whose WRITING SUCKS! Well, Singer’s at it again with a book that revisits his deeply reported, psychological portrait, and he joins us Tuesday to talk about it.

Major James B Pond, University of Virginia Library, http://bit.ly/2a0uRqV

Monday, we’re telling the story of what author Richard Zacks calls Mark Twain’s “raucous and redemptive round-the-world comedy tour.” Twain was once America’s highest paid writer, but he was also a remarkably bad businessman. In 1895, with his career on the rocks and with what today would be millions in debt, Twain embarked on a 5-continent speaking tour he hoped would save him. Zacks joins Doug to talk about Twain’s wildly popular humor, his missteps, and what drove his quest for redemption.

Thursday, biographer Kate Clifford Larson is with us to talk about the life of Rosemary Kennedy. She was a sister of John F. Kennedy, a vivacious beauty, and also intellectually challenged. As the Kennedy family’s power grew, her parents were anxious to keep her from the public eye. So at 23, she was lobotomized and institutionalized. Larson joins us to explain what Rosemary’s story reveals about the way we once dealt with disabilities, and how her life eventually inspired the Kennedys’ activism. (Rebroadcast)

[cropped] istolethetv via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/uEGuCL, https://goo.gl/z2PPQx

For the latest installment in our Through the Lens series, we’re trying something different and talking about an in-the-works documentary. Director Ellen Goosenberg-Kent is working on a film called Don’t Make Me Over about the life and career of famed singer Dionne Warwick. Recognized at an early age for her vocal talent, Warwick was one the greatest female voices of her generation and an outspoken advocate for social and political change. Warwick and others will join us to talk about her inspiring journey.

Monday, writer Nathaniel Philbrick joins us to talk about George Washington and his buddy Benedict Arnold. Arnold has long been regarded as the archetypal American traitor. But before he betrayed his country, he was actually one of Washington’s favorite and most trusted generals. In a new book, Philbrick examines the complicated relationship between the two men. Ultimately, he says, it’s about their different reactions to a dysfunctional Congress that was driven by self-righteous opportunism. (Rebroadcast)

When she was 22 years old, Judith Freeman was struggling. Having abandoned her family’s Mormon faith, she was in the process of a divorce and having an affair with her son’s heart surgeon, a married father of three. In the midst of this turmoil, Freeman resolved to become a writer. Well, she did. Her seventh published book is a memoir, called The Latter Days. It’s about that pivotal, trying time in her youth. Freeman joins us Tuesday to talk about her story of resilience, forgiveness, and self-discovery.

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