Science

Science news

No idea from psychology has saturated popular culture like Hermann Rorschach’s inkblots. Friday, writer Damion Searls join us to talk about Rorschach’s life and the influence of his iconic creation.

Thursday, we’re asking this question: Is it true that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger? Investigative journalist and anthropologist Scott Carney went looking for answers. He joins us to talk about pushing past perceived limitations. (Rebroadcast)

Wednesday, we're talking about your compulsions. Everyone has them. Maybe you're a neat freak, or maybe it's exercise. But compulsions don't necessarily mean your brain is broken. In fact, they're a perfectly natural response to anxiety.

Photo by Andrew Morffew, CC via Flickr

Serious researchers long shied away from so-called anthropomorphism. But biologist John Shivik says animal personalities and emotion are key to understanding how species evolved. So why are some animals shy and others ornery?

Horn of a grammaphone.
wolfgangfoto / flickr cc

Wednesday, we’re talking about a podcast that challenges listeners to refine their sense of hearing. For host Dallas Taylor, sound can change how we experience and enjoy life and the world around us.

Open pea pod showing four peas.
Isabel Eyre / Flickr CC

Monday, science writer Carl Zimmer joins us to talk about the power of heredity. The traits we share with our parents or kids, how does that work exactly? Zimmer says it can be a gift or a curse.

Land On Fire

Jul 27, 2018
Hot show crew faces a fire along a forest road.
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Public Domain

Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. He joins us to talk about role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West. 

Allie Jones via CC/Flickr, https://bit.ly/2JmHz3R

Tuesday, we're talking about jellyfish. Chances are you've never given them a second thought. The science writer Juli Berwald gets it, but she loves them. She's written a new book about how complicated and beautiful they are.

Cat sitting like human on sofa.
Vszybala via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2fCvqsa

Despite their ubiquity in modern life, science journalist Abigail Tucker says we know very little about what cats are, how they came to live among us, and why we love these furry freeloaders. (Rebroadcast)

Since life first evolved on earth more than four billion years ago, it has passed in and out of existence five times. Make that six. An extinction event is happening right now. So what can we learn about the previous ones? (Rebroadcast)

Pages