Science

Science news

American Wolf

Jan 8, 2018
Doug McLaughlin


The reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone was controversial when it happened in 1995, and it added more fuel to the blazing feud between conservationists and the ranchers and hunters who wish wolves had never returned to the Rockies.

The Nature Fix

Jan 5, 2018
Mark Stevens via CC BY-NC-SA 2.0/Flickr http://bit.ly/1hYHpKw

For centuries, poets and philosophers extolled the benefits of a walk in the woods. The writer Florence Williams set out to learn if they were right. She discovered that time in nature is not just a luxury; it's actually essential to our humanity.

The Ends of the World

Dec 27, 2017
Mark Byzewski via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2kLZtoW), CC BY 2.0 (http://bit.ly/1mhaR6e)

Since first evolved on earth more than four billion years ago, it has passed in and out of existence five times. Make that six. An extinction event is happening right now. So what can we learn about the previous ones?

Friday, we're talking about your compulsions. Everyone has them. Maybe you're a neat freak, or maybe it's exercise. But compulsions don't necessarily mean your brain is broken. In fact, they're a perfectly natural response to anxiety.

Wild Horse Country

Dec 18, 2017

The wild horse is a majestic, beloved, and federally protected icon of the American frontier with a history as epic as the land it inhabits. It’s also the subject of heated controversy and dispute.

Matt Buck via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2BUKw

Well, it’s back. Again. Bad air is choking northern Utah, and it could be around for a while. But we’re not the only ones who have to deal with toxic air pollution. These days it’s a global problem, and people everywhere are looking for solutions.

Woolly

Dec 8, 2017
Photo by Timothy Nessam, http://bit.ly/2wjjMLQ, CC via Flickr

Believe it or not, scientists are actually trying to bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction. It's not going to be easy, but if they get it right, and if they manage all the legal and ethical hurdles, the results could actually help save the world.

 

Friday, we're talking about how unhealthy sugar is for you. No, we're not trying to be killjoys. But as you recover from and regret that third helping of pie on Thanksgiving, we thought you might want to know why you'd probably be healthier without sugar. (Rebroadcast)

Josué Menjivar via CC/Flickr http://bit.ly/2zqVOnr


Changing people’s minds is hard. And it’s a problem a lot of people encounter on Thanksgiving. Neuroscientist Tali Sharot studies decision-making. She says we can better influence people by understanding how the brain is wired.

Photo by Andrew Morffew, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2zH8rKl

Serious researchers long shied away from so-called anthropomorphism. But biologist John Shivik says animal personalities and emotion are key to understanding how species evolved. So why are some animals shy and others ornery? Shivik joins us Thursday.

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