Science

Science news

Psychedelic flax landscape.
AK Rockefeller / CC via Flickr

The writer Michael Pollan is with us to talk about his new book on psychedelics. It’s about their potential to heal mental illnesses, and to explore the subject, Pollan took a few trips himself.

A tightly-packed crowd of people.
Photo by Espen Sundve, CC via Flickr, https://bit.ly/2ITAqrs

Wednesday, we’re going to try to give A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived. It’s actually the title of geneticist Adam Rutherford’s new book. It describes the history of humankind through genetics.

Vit Brunner via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/2ox1hBJ

Monday, we’re talking about timing. The writer Daniel Pink says timing is a science, and knowing how it works can make us better at our jobs and more creative. It’s not just about doing the things we do, but knowing when.

Woolly

May 3, 2018
Photo by Timothy Nessam, http://bit.ly/2wjjMLQ, CC via Flickr

Believe it or not, scientists are actually trying to bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction. It's not going to be easy, but if they get it right, and if they manage all the legal and ethical hurdles, the results could actually help save the world.

Quackery

Apr 27, 2018
Photo by Wayne S. Grazio, CC via Flickr, http://bit.ly/2DVg7uK

Friday, we’re talking about some of the weirdest ways we’ve tried to cure our bodies and minds through the ages. Doctor and author Lydia Kang is our guide and she says we still need to be saved from quacks.

Allie Jones via CC/Flickr, https://bit.ly/2JmHz3R

Tuesday, we're talking about jellyfish. Chances are you've never given them a second thought. The science writer Juli Berwald gets it, but she loves them. She's written a new book about how complicated and beautiful they are.

A tightly-packed crowd of people.
Photo by Espen Sundve, CC via Flickr, https://bit.ly/2ITAqrs

Monday, we’re going to try to give A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived. It’s actually the title of geneticist Adam Rutherford’s new book. It describes the history of humankind through genetics.

Friday, cognitive scientist Benjamin Bergen explains why we use swear words, why they’re so powerful, and how they work in our language and on our minds. (And we've bleeped the really bad ones.)

In Pursuit of Memory

Mar 28, 2018

Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli became interested in Alzheimer’s disease as he watched his own grandfather go through it. There’s a good chance it’s touched someone in your life too; Jebelli calls it the next global pandemic.

American Wolf

Mar 26, 2018
Doug McLaughlin

The reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone was controversial when it happened in 1995, and it added more fuel to the blazing feud between conservationists and the ranchers and hunters who wish wolves had never returned to the Rockies.

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