Science

Science news

Mark Robinson via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1GLwTU1

The history of the domestic pig is a tale of both love and loathing. We cherish pigs for the delicious meat they supply. But, as an animals that eats and roots in filth, swine are often met with contempt. In a new book of porcine history, the writer Mark Essig follows the humble pig’s journey from Neolithic villages to modern industrial farms. Essig joins us Tuesday to explore the pig’s vast importance, the tragedy of its modern treatment, and its complicated relationship with humanity.  (Rebroadcast)

Life With Dementia

Jan 13, 2016

Every 67 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease. That’s more than 5 million people and the number is growing. Add to that the fact Alzheimer’s is only one type of dementia, and it makes sense that journalist David Shenk calls this an epidemic. Wednesday, as we launch a new short documentary series profiling one Utah woman’s advancing dementia, Shenk joins us to talk about the disease and its impact on individuals and the community.

Headspace

Jan 7, 2016

When was the last time you stopped for a few minutes to reflect on the present moment? Not the thing you screwed up yesterday, or the meeting you’re worried about tomorrow, but the here and now. Meditation and mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe says those few minutes are key to decreased anxiety, better sleep, and improved focus. He’s the creator of a popular app that guides users through meditation, and he joins Doug to talk about finding “Headspace” in your life. (Rebroadcast)

Carl Safina

Animals have deeply fascinated the writer Carl Safina since he was a little kid, and he’s always wondered what animals do and why they do it. More than anything, Safina wants to know what it’s like inside other animals’ minds and in their day to day lives. To try to find out, he traveled to Yellowstone to observe wolf packs, visited elephants in Africa, tracked orcas in Vancouver, and just hung out with his dog at home. Safina joins us Wednesday to offer his insight into what animals think and feel.

Pierre-Selim via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1GRp27B

For years, science has told us that intelligence originates in the brain and that the body is just a vehicle to be controlled and piloted. But what if we’ve got it wrong? The cognitive scientist Guy Claxton thinks we do. The mind, he says, is more like a chat room, where the body’s systems share information and debate the best actions. So it’s the really the body, not the mind, that constitutes the core of our intelligent life. Claxton joins us Tuesday to explore the intelligence in our flesh. [Rebroadcast]

A Health Blog via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1IFGfXZ

Ask yourself this question: Am I conscious now? The answer is probably yes, but what does that really mean? What exactly is consciousness? Where does it come from? Are we always conscious, even when we don’t stop and recognize it? The quandary of consciousness has long puzzled scientists, psychiatrists, philosophers, and others, and numerous ways of explaining it have been proposed. Thursday, the writer Susan Blackmore joins us to explore some those theories as we probe the nature of consciousness.

J. Michael Tracy via CC, http://bit.ly/1MBA7Q8

Forecasting is a part of everyday life. We’re always making decisions based on some expectation of future outcomes. But sad to say, most of us are pretty bad at it. Psychologist Philip Tetlock has devoted his career to changing that. He wants to know what makes some people incredibly good at making predictions—he calls them superforecasters—and then he wants to teach that talent to others. Tetlock joins us Thursday to explore how we can all be better decision makers and thus better thinkers.

Evolving Faith

Oct 28, 2015

Wednesday, we’re talking about the complicated and surprising relationship between Mormonism and science. Brigham Young University boasts a highly regarded biology department, and while the LDS Church has no official doctrine on evolution, many members view the theory with suspicion. It’s that tension that BYU Professor Steven Peck addresses in his new book Evolving Faith. He joins Doug to explain why he says religion and science are simply two different ways of knowing.

Headspace

Oct 27, 2015

When was the last time you stopped for a few minutes to reflect on the present moment? Not the thing you screwed up yesterday, or the meeting you’re worried about tomorrow, but the here and now. Meditation and mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe says those few minutes are key to decreased anxiety, better sleep, and improved focus. He’s the creator of a popular app that guides users through meditation, and Tuesday he joins Doug to talk about finding “Headspace” in your life.

Pierre-Selim via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1GRp27B

For years, science has told us that intelligence originates in the brain and that the body is just a vehicle to be controlled and piloted. But what if we’ve got it wrong? The cognitive scientist Guy Claxton thinks we do. The mind, he says, is more like a chat room, where the body’s systems share information and debate the best actions. So it’s the really the body, not the mind, that constitutes the core of our intelligent life. Claxton joins us Wednesday to explore the intelligence in our flesh.

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