Science

Science news

Ray Troll, www.trollart.com

For centuries, wild salmon runs around the world have been disappearing, due largely to industrial development and dam construction. So when you see salmon on a restaurant menu, it’s likely the meat came from a fish farm. Filmmaker and fisherman Mark Titus went on a personal journey to learn what’s happening to America’s salmon and figure out what can be done to restore them and their waters to better health. He joins us Tuesday to talk about his new documentary about the future of wild salmon.

Vitamania

May 11, 2015
Rob via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/18Grio7

To many people, the term “vitamin” is shorthand for “health,” and so the more vitamins we consume, the healthier we’ll be. But what exactly do the 13 dietary chemicals we call vitamins actually do for our bodies? And how much of each vitamin do we need? The journalist Catherine Price went looking for answers to these basic questions. What she learned undermines much of what we thought we knew about nutrition. She joins us Monday to talk about our quest for better health through nutrition perfection.

Natural Born Heroes

May 7, 2015

  Thursday, our guest is journalist Christopher McDougall who wrote the book that kicked off the barefoot running movement. While he was writing, McDougall came across the story of a Greek foot messenger who accomplished remarkable athletic feats during World War II. It got him thinking about what makes a hero, and he learned it’s not chance and you don’t have to be superhuman. McDougall is in Utah and joins us to explore how normal people can develop their natural skills to be ready in a crisis.

Alpha God

Apr 28, 2015

  For some, God is a violent and fearsome deity. It's an idea used to justify atrocities and oppression committed in His name. The psychologist Hector Garcia says that we have created this God in our own image, and to understand Him, we first have to understand how our own psychology has evolved over eons. Tuesday, Garcia joins Doug to talk about the way humanity's quest for evolutionary success resulted in an "Alpha God" who is more a reflection of us than we are of Him.

In an online video, biomechanist Katy Bowman guides a tour of her home. It’s a lot of the usual stuff, but what’s missing is all the furniture. Katy and her family don’t have a couch or recliners or even chairs at the kitchen table. That’s so they have every possible opportunity for physical movement, which is a central idea of Bowman’s philosophy. She wants people to improve their health and their well being by exercising less and moving more and better. She joins us Monday to explain how and why.

Nature Needs Half

Apr 8, 2015

For centuries, humans have used technology to alter the planet, with dramatic consequences for the environment. Some think technology can also be used to manage our way out of these problems. It’s an approach that places humans at the center of everything. But conservationist Harvey Locke builds his work around a different idea: we do not control the world; we are part of it. Locke advocates a "wiser" relationship with nature, and Wednesday, he joins Doug in studio to talk about his goal to conserve half the world’s land and water.

Cancer was first mentioned in an ancient Egyptian scroll and through the modern era, its history is marked by the epic battles we've waged against it. Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer physician, and in trying to understand what his patients must endure, he turned a historical and literary eye on cancer. His Pulitzer-prize winning book is now a PBS documentary premiering Monday. So, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Mukherjee about the disease he calls “The Emperor of All Maladies.” (Rebroadcast)

Animal Madness

Mar 24, 2015
Photo by Emily Orpin, CC via Flickr

 

Laurel Braitman was very worried about her dog’s mental health. Oliver was an anxious animal, especially when left home alone. And he was alone when he moved an air conditioner, chewed through a screen, and jumped out of a 3rd story window. Braitman is a science historian, and her new book explores seemingly human mental disorders in the animal kingdom. Tuesday, she joins Doug to explain why every animal with a mind has the capacity to lose it from time to time. [Rebroadcast]

A Climate for Change

Mar 23, 2015

  Why is it that conservative Christians are more likely to be climate change skeptics than any other religious group in America?  Katharine Hayhoe doesn’t see any reason why science and religion should be mutually exclusive. She’s a leading climate scientist, but she’s also an evangelical who’s married to a minister. She says part of the problem is that we’ve confused politics with faith. Hayhoe is in Utah, and Monday, she joins us to talk about religion, the environment, and bridging the divide between them.

The average person has about 4,000 thoughts a day. Most are fleeting snippets, some are banal, and sometimes, they can be disruptive. But when most people question whether they left the coffee maker on or imagine something bizarre like jumping out into traffic, they shake it off. A person with OCD though can’t let it go, and may spend as many as 6 hours a day obsessing over that one idea. Tuesday, Doug’s guest is the science writer David Adam. He’s written a book about OCD and his own life lost in thought.

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