Science

Science news

Pierre-Selim via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1GRp27B

For years, science has told us that intelligence originates in the brain and that the body is just a vehicle to be controlled and piloted. But what if we’ve got it wrong? The cognitive scientist Guy Claxton thinks we do. The mind, he says, is more like a chat room, where the body’s systems share information and debate the best actions. So it’s the really the body, not the mind, that constitutes the core of our intelligent life. Claxton joins us Tuesday to explore the intelligence in our flesh. [Rebroadcast]

A Health Blog via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1IFGfXZ

Ask yourself this question: Am I conscious now? The answer is probably yes, but what does that really mean? What exactly is consciousness? Where does it come from? Are we always conscious, even when we don’t stop and recognize it? The quandary of consciousness has long puzzled scientists, psychiatrists, philosophers, and others, and numerous ways of explaining it have been proposed. Thursday, the writer Susan Blackmore joins us to explore some those theories as we probe the nature of consciousness.

J. Michael Tracy via CC, http://bit.ly/1MBA7Q8

Forecasting is a part of everyday life. We’re always making decisions based on some expectation of future outcomes. But sad to say, most of us are pretty bad at it. Psychologist Philip Tetlock has devoted his career to changing that. He wants to know what makes some people incredibly good at making predictions—he calls them superforecasters—and then he wants to teach that talent to others. Tetlock joins us Thursday to explore how we can all be better decision makers and thus better thinkers.

Evolving Faith

Oct 28, 2015

Wednesday, we’re talking about the complicated and surprising relationship between Mormonism and science. Brigham Young University boasts a highly regarded biology department, and while the LDS Church has no official doctrine on evolution, many members view the theory with suspicion. It’s that tension that BYU Professor Steven Peck addresses in his new book Evolving Faith. He joins Doug to explain why he says religion and science are simply two different ways of knowing.

Headspace

Oct 27, 2015

When was the last time you stopped for a few minutes to reflect on the present moment? Not the thing you screwed up yesterday, or the meeting you’re worried about tomorrow, but the here and now. Meditation and mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe says those few minutes are key to decreased anxiety, better sleep, and improved focus. He’s the creator of a popular app that guides users through meditation, and Tuesday he joins Doug to talk about finding “Headspace” in your life.

Pierre-Selim via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1GRp27B

For years, science has told us that intelligence originates in the brain and that the body is just a vehicle to be controlled and piloted. But what if we’ve got it wrong? The cognitive scientist Guy Claxton thinks we do. The mind, he says, is more like a chat room, where the body’s systems share information and debate the best actions. So it’s the really the body, not the mind, that constitutes the core of our intelligent life. Claxton joins us Wednesday to explore the intelligence in our flesh.

The Human Journey

Oct 13, 2015
Dave Fullmer via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1jt8cXl

Where do humans come from? Who were our ancestors? What makes us distinct from them? And why are we homo sapiens the only kind of people left on the planet? These are some of the big questions paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer has spent his life trying to answer. Thanks to recent scientific advances and anthropological discoveries, Stringer thinks we’re closer than ever to understanding the vast journey of human evolution. He joins us Tuesday to present his theories on the origins of humankind.

In an online video, biomechanist Katy Bowman guides a tour of her home. It’s a lot of the usual stuff, but what’s missing is all the furniture. Katy and her family don’t have a couch or recliners or even chairs at the kitchen table. That’s so they have every possible opportunity for physical movement, which is a central idea of Bowman’s philosophy. She wants people to improve their health and their well being by exercising less and moving more and better. She joins us to explain how and why. (Rebroadcast)

Alive Inside

Sep 24, 2015

You may be one of the millions of people who’ve seen the viral video of Henry, an elderly man in a nursing home who popped out of the fog of dementia when he heard a cherished tune from his youth. That video is actually part of a larger documentary called Alive Inside that explores the healing power of music. It’s screening in Salt Lake City next week, so we're rebroadcasting our conversation with the film’s director, Michael Rossato-Bennett. We also spoke with social worker Dan Cohen, who’s trying to convince the world that music can enliven elderly people suffering from dementia and also help us provide them better care. (Rebroadcast)

Oceanic Preservation Society, http://www.opsociety.org

In his last film, director Louie Psihoyos shed light on the shadowy practice of dolphin slaughter in Japan. His new film, Racing Extinction, bears witness to an even greater tragedy: the sixth extinction event, the one we’re causing. He and his filmmaking team went undercover to expose how the international wildlife trade and the oil and gas industries are together driving species around the globe to extinction. Psihoyos joins us Thursday to talk about that crisis and what can be done to stop it.

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