Utah

Thursday, we’re talking about the relationship between the police and the public. Last week, Alex Wubbel’s arrest video went viral. She’s, of course, the nurse that wouldn’t allow Salt Lake Police Detective Jeff Payne to draw blood from an unconscious patient without a warrant. The video showed what many saw as unreasonable escalation on Payne’s part. We’re using this as a jumping off point to explore how power and authority are wielded by American police, and what that means for those they are called to protect. 

Thursday, we’re telling stories of legendary Utah Symphony conductor Maurice Abravanel. The Maestro led the symphony for 32 years with the philosophy that good music should be available to everyone. He created a pioneering education program and built the orchestra into an internationally renowned recording powerhouse with some 120 albums. Former associate conductor Ardean Watts and retired cellist Carolee Baron will join us to talk about the life and musical passions of Maestro Maurice Abravanel.

Photo by <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/allaboutgeorge/4426219005/in/photolist-7K8wGM">George Kelly</a>, CC via Flickr

This weekend, the Salt Lake Tribune reported that Jon Huntsman, Sr’s efforts to buy the state’s largest daily newspaper had reached “an impasse.” The paper operates under an agreement that gives veto power of a sale to the LDS Church and 70% of the profits to the Church-owned Deseret News. Journalism professor Matthew LaPlante says without a renegotiation it’s hard to imagine anyone willing to buy the struggling daily. Wednesday, he joins us to talk about the future of this two-newspaper town.

brykmantra via CC/Flickr, http://bit.ly/1LK1GCe

After Governor Gary Herbert’s plan for expanding Medicaid coverage died in the Utah state legislature this spring, six Republican leaders were tasked with devising a compromise plan. They met behind closed doors for months. The plan they recently unveiled, Utah Access Plus, called on health care providers to contribute $50 million in subsidies. That plan died Tuesday afternoon in a GOP meeting. Wednesday, we’ll discuss how the plan was crafted, why it failed, and ask what comes next Medicaid in Utah.

The Shrinking Salt Flats

Aug 6, 2015


  Thursday, we’re talking about the Bonneville Salt Flats’ rip-roaring past and uncertain future. The vast, white expanse is ideal for driving fast, but thinning salt has forced the cancellation* of this year’s big races. Is mining to blame? Or too much rain? Guest host Matt Canham is joined by photojournalist and writer Landspeed Louise Noeth, geologist Brenda Bowen, and the BLM’s Kevin Oliver to discuss what we can and should be doing about the increasingly endangered salt flats.

L'anarchiste

May 15, 2012
Gavin Sheehan

We're cramming all six members of the Salt Lake City-based band L'anarchiste into the studio on Wednesday as part of our Local Music series. The music of L'anarchiste began as a one-man project in Rob LeCheminant's basement. As great as his solo-produced debut EP is, it's not much fun to go to a concert to see a guy hit the play button on his computer. So LeCheminant recruited five musicians to help perform his densely structured take on indie folk. We'll talk to L’anarchiste and survey new local bands and albums.

There's geologic evidence of 6.5 and greater earthquakes violently shaking our region. Seismologists say it will happen again in Utah, though it's difficult to say when. We do know that there could be devastating consequences for the urban landscape. Tuesday, the state is sponsoring an earthquake drill called "The Great Utah ShakeOut," so we're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation about earthquakes and what one would mean for the Wasatch Front. (Rebroadcast)

Friday, we're talking about Utah on the silver screen. Our guest is BYU film historian James D'Arc whose book chronicles Utah's part in American cinema from the early days of silent film to today. More than 700 movies and television productions have been made here, and it has meant big business for the small towns that welcomed directors, actors and production crews. As one Moab rancher explained, "They don't take anything but pictures and don't leave anything except money." (Rebroadcast)

<a href="http://www.mcnaughtonart.com/" target="_blank">McNaughtonArt.com</a>

Provo painter Jon McNaughton is getting attention for his latest work "One Nation Under Socialism." It depicts Barack Obama holding the Constitution as it burns. Art critics aren't impressed; it's been called "junk" and "visually dead as a doornail." McNaughton isn't worried about impressing the arts community though; he says his goal is to communicate a political opinion. Thursday, McNaughton and others will join us to talk about political imagery and the relationship between art and ideology.

In 2000, a man in Moab left his life savings - $30 - in a phone booth and walked away. Twelve years later, Daniel Suelo enjoys an apparently full and sane life without money, credit, barter or government hand-outs, fulfilling a vision of the good life inspired by his spiritual guides: Jesus, Buddha and wandering Hindu monks. The writer Mark Sundeen has written a book that traces the path and the singular idea that led Suelo to his extreme lifestyle, and he joins Doug on Wednesday.

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