Utah Profiles

North Star International, Voices of Hope Project, http://bit.ly/2o08ydI

Monday, we’re talking about the delicate balance of being religiously conservative and attracted to the same sex. Ty Mansfield is a family therapist and he’s attracted to men. He’s also married to a woman, has kids, and is a faithful Mormon. Mansfield believes that human sexuality is fluid enough for some gay people - not all - but some to be perfectly happy married to someone of the opposite sex. Mansfield joins us to share his own story, and to talk about what he’s learning about sexuality and happiness.

Leah Hogsten | Salt Lake Tribune

Salt Lake City resident Pierre-Richard Prosper is the son of Haitian immigrants, a former district attorney in Los Angeles at the height of the gang violence there, and he was the lead prosecutor in the first trial for genocide and rape as war crimes. Those are just a few of his stories, but in many ways they’ve shaped his view of the world. Prosper believes deeply in the law’s ability to right wrongs that we could have prevented in the first place. He joins us Thursday to talk about his fascinating life.

KUER News

When Governor Gary Herbert appointed Spencer Cox as Utah’s Lieutenant Governor in 2013, his communications team suggested that Cox edit his bio. They wanted him to take out the part about being in a rock band. But Spencer Cox says that’s what’s wrong with politicians. They’re so worried about re-election, they’re afraid to say “I play the bass.” Monday, Cox joins Doug to talk about unconventional political choices, his 100-mile commute, and why he’s still rockin’ bass lines with his band UpSide.

Salt Lake Tribune, April 8, 1968

  The poet Katharine Coles considers herself a typical Utahn, though maybe a different “typical” than what might spring to mind. She was born and raised in Salt Lake City, and her parents gave the family a life of adventure in the red rock desert and the mountains. They were also intellectuals and social activists, so Coles was encouraged to explore and to make her voice heard. Monday, Katharine Coles joins Doug to talk about Utah and other lenses that shape her poetic view of the world.

  Wednesday, Doug sits down with queer theorist Kathryn Bond Stockton. She’s Associate Vice President for Equity and Diversity at the University of Utah. Once upon a time though, she was a born-again evangelical who later earned a degree from Yale Divinity School. She says people were shocked when she came to Utah in 1987, but Stockton was ready to be a “missionary to the missionaries.” She joins us to talk about the ways she expresses her evangelical spirit today in social and economic justice.

Poet Jacqueline Osherow was raised in Philadelphia, where she says Hebrew school instilled in her the idea that words really, really matter. She remembers listening to the Psalms, but it wasn’t until she came to Utah that she finally understood the passage, “I will lift my eyes to the mountains, where help will come.” Tuesday, the University of Utah professor of English and Creative Writing joins Doug to talk about poetry, Judaism, Italian art, and much more.

KUED

Thursday, our guest is local attorney Ron Yengich. He’s argued before the bench as a defense lawyer for four decades and the Utah State Bar recently named him lawyer of the year. Yengich is a devout Catholic and he traces his journey into law to his religious upbringing and parochial education—and then there was that one time he got arrested. He’ll share with Doug his stories of a career defending people society is quick to cast aside. He’s also a huge baseball fan, so we’ll talk about that, too.

Wednesday, Doug’s guest is Ardean Watts, who served as associate conductor of the Utah Symphony and is Professor Emeritus of Music at the University of Utah. Watts says that if there’s one unifying theme in his life though, it’s that he’s a generalist who is interested in everything. So, we’ll ask him to tell us stories from his distinguished music career, but we’ll also talk about his LDS background, raising a family of 8 kids, Chinese philosophy, mushroom hunting and more.

The Bishop's Wife

Mar 4, 2015

Utah novelist Mette Ivie Harrison had already written YA novels and a memoir, but she was still trying to work through her thoughts about Mormonism, women’s roles, motherhood and grief. Her ideas eventually coalesced around a female detective in Draper, Utah. The result is a crime novel that’s been getting attention around the country. Wednesday, Harrison joins Doug to talk about the real stories that influenced the book, her faith, and her observations on Mormon culture.

Thursday, Doug’s guest is Utah author and artist Teresa Jordan. Jordan was searching for a project to get her writing muscles back in shape, when she learned about Benjamin Franklin’s project “of arriving at moral perfection.” His idea was to master a list of thirteen virtues. Jordan decided to try it herself (after throwing in a few vices), and blog about it. She’s now published a memoir of her “Year of Living Virtuously,” and we’ll talk about why neither she nor Franklin achieved perfection.

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