LDS History, Faith, and Culture

A collection of RadioWest conversations about LDS history, faith, and culture.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/imnohero/2345543856/">im.no.hero</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Utah has a reputation for some of the strictest liquor laws in the country and the Utah Hospitality Association says the LDS Church directly influences lawmakers on these issues. As part of their effort to overturn a recent law, the group is suing to keep state legislators from considering Church opinion when creating alcohol regulations. Monday, we're talking about Utah liquor laws and about what role morality and religion play in creating public policy.

Courtesy <a href="http://harpers.org/" target="_blank">harpers.org</a>

In a new article for Harper's Magazine, journalist Chris Lehmann argues that Mormon economic life is everything the GOP could hope for and has been since the early days of the LDS Church. Lehmann calls Mormons "free-market apostles," pointing to their distrust of debt and government, their respect for self-reliance over welfare and what he calls a tendency to fetishize precious metals over currency. Lehmann joins Doug to explain why he says when it comes to the economy "We are all Mormons now."

Far Between

Aug 18, 2011

Last month, filmmaker Kendall Wilcox made a bold decision. He decided it was the right time for him to admit publically that he is gay. Of course, this process can be difficult for anyone, but Wilcox is an employee of the LDS Church, he teaches at Brigham Young University and he's a producer for BYUTV. Now, he's in the process of making a film that explores the tension between faith and sexual identity. Thursday, Wilcox joins Doug to talk about being "Far Between."

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