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Megadroughts, Pt. 2: The Present

Earlier this spring, Oakley joined the nearby town of Henefer in banning some new construction out of concerns about available water. It’s an usual step for our growing state, but as historic drought continues to grip the West, these are the kinds of hard decisions our region is facing.

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Web Extra: How Trauma Lives In Our Bodies

Psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk is an expert on treating trauma. He says that the body and brain are literally reshaped after a traumatic experience. And in the past year, Americans have collectively experienced quite a bit of trauma.

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RadioWest | Films

In 1983, Robert Michael Painter died of an AIDS-related illness in Salt Lake City, Utah. It was the first documented AIDS death in the state.

Blink O'fanaye / Flickr Creative Commons

In May, a Public Religion Research Institute survey found that nearly one in five members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints believes in QAnon — placing them just about in the middle of the Christian denominations polled. 

Renee Bright / KUER

We can probably all picture the stereotype of cult members: glassy-eyed, dressed alike, fixated on their leader. And then we might feel smug, because we’re nothing like them. Right?

Renee Bright / KUER

For years, folk singer Johnny Flynn and nature writer Robert Macfarlane admired each other’s work from afar. When they became friends, the two creators combined their talents to make an album together.

BRIANA JACKSON / ISTOCK

Real estate across the country has never been a hotter commodity. A couple years ago, there were already more potential homebuyers than there were available homes. But then the COVID pandemic hit, causing a greater housing demand coupled with a shortage of lumber and construction labor.

Courtesy World Debut

For almost as long as they’ve been around, skateboarding, sport climbing and surfing have been mostly thought of as action sports — and not the sports that come to mind when thinking about the Olympics. But, then again, times change.

Renee Bright / KUER

How much can you know about someone just from hearing their voice? According to journalist John Colapinto, more than you might think.

Courtesy of filmmakers.

Filmed at the most remote high school in the continental U.S., the new documentary Scenes from the Glittering World follows three young people as they come of age in the Navajo Nation. 

The American West is parched right now by extreme and persistent drought. That has a lot of people wondering what will happen if the rains don’t come and the water dries up. But if history has anything to teach us about megadroughts, it’s that they can pose a very serious threat to civilization.

Renee Bright/Wikimedia Commons

Enslaved African-Americans in Texas didn’t learn they’d been freed until weeks after the Civil War officially ended — when Union General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston to break the news.

Tim Slover / KUER

If you look at a forest, what do you see? It’s just trees, right? Well, when Suzanne Simard looks at a forest, she sees a community of social, cooperative, communicative creatures with lives very much like our own.

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Kelsie Moore / KUER

The Miracle Of The Gulls And Other Utah Legends

One of Utah’s many oddities is its state bird: the California Gull. But did you know that the humble gull is the hero in its own miracle tale?

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RadioWest Book Club: 'One Hundred Years Of Solitude'

The RadioWest Book Club met recently to discuss Gabriel García Márquez's novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude."

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