wildly curious
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
It seems like everyday you hear about a new do-it-all fitness regimen or a new study showing that the exercises that you once thought were best are actually bad for you. In our 21st Century Fitness series, we consult the brightest minds to try to cut through the fat and find out what it really takes to be fit and healthy today.

Exercise Less, Move More

katy_bowman.jpeg
Katy Bowman, www.nutritiousmovement.com
/
Katy Bowman's home office.

In an online video, biomechanist Katy Bowman guides a tour of her home. It’s a lot of the usual stuff, but what’s missing is all the furniture. Katy and her family don’t have a couch or recliners or even chairs at the kitchen table. That’s so they have every possible opportunity for physical movement, which is a central idea of Bowman’s philosophy. She wants people to improve their health and their well being by exercising less and moving more and better. She joins us Monday to explain how and why.

Katy Bowman is a biomechanist and the founder and director of the Restorative Exercise Institute, an organization and online training program that teaches the biomechanical model of preventative medicine. She blogs at KatySays.com. She’s the author of several books. Her newest is called and Move Your DNA [Amazon|Indiebound].

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.