Doug Fabrizio

Host/Executive Producer

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Ways to Connect

From Decoloning Mormon Cover / University of Utah Press

Is the LDS Church really an international church? More than half of the world’s Mormons live outside the U.S., but the editors of a new book say decisions are made by white, mostly American men.

Open pea pod showing four peas.
Isabel Eyre / Flickr CC

Monday, science writer Carl Zimmer joins us to talk about the power of heredity. The traits we share with our parents or kids, how does that work exactly? Zimmer says it can be a gift or a curse.

Land On Fire

Jul 27, 2018
Hot show crew faces a fire along a forest road.
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Public Domain

Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. He joins us to talk about role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West. 

Black and white print of world's first factory.
Public Domain

Historian Joshua Freeman joins us to talk about the history of factories, which is really interesting when you consider the lives of the people who've worked in them and how they've shaped our world. (Rebroadcast)

Chart, Utah suicide deaths per 100,000, ages 10-17.  17 in 2011 to 44 in 2015, 32 in 2016, and 42 in 2017.
Elaine Clark / KUER

Utah has seen a staggering increase in youth suicide and some advocates blame LDS Church policies. Wednesday, we’re asking what the research shows and how religion can hurt or help kids in crisis.

The writer Alexandra Fuller joins us to talk about her latest book, a novel about two Native American cousins on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. (Rebroadcast)

Collage, pictures of Stephen Miller and examples of his statements
The Atlantic

Monday, we’re talking about Trump adviser Stephen Miller with The Atlantic's McKay Coppins. Miller whips up crowds at Trump rallies and chastises the White House press corps. Basically, he’s a troll.

Mary Todd Lincoln with Abraham Lincoln's "spirit" behind her.
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection, Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana

William Mumler was a 19th-century photographer who took portraits of people and the ghosts of their departed. And he made a good living at it until he was arrested for fraud. (Rebroadcast)

Ancient swastika symbol laid in mosaic tile
Public domain

The swastika evokes visceral reactions in the Western world, but for years it symbolized good fortune and well-being. We talk to designer Steven Heller about the swastika’s history, and ask if it can ever be seen in its original context again.

Thumbs down icon
Public domain

Jaron Lanier, one of Silicon Valley's most influential figures, wants to convince you to delete your social media accounts. He has ten arguments for why you should do that. One of them: Social media is turning us all into jerks.

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