The Debate Over the Electoral College

Nov 17, 2016

Last week’s presidential election marked the fifth time that there was a split on the popular and electoral college vote. Of course, it wasn’t the first time it’s happened in the early years of 21st century, and that’s got a lot of people are asking: why do we have an electoral college? How’d we end up with this obscure voting method? Defenders argue it’s a cornerstone of the American republic, while opponents counter that it doesn’t value each vote equally. Thursday, we’ll hear from both sides of the debate.

Akhil Reed Amar is the Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University. He’s the author of several books, including his newest, The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of Our Era [Amazon|Indiebound]

Gary L. Gregg II is a presidential scholar and the director of the McConnell Center for Political Leadership at the University of Louisville. He is the author or editor of many books, including Securing Democracy: Why We Have an Electoral College [Amazon|Indiebound].