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Searching For The Lost Colony Of Roanoke

Trees standing in water with mysterious mist.
Cover "The Secret Token" / Doubleday
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In 1590, 115 English settlers vanished from present-day North Carolina with little trace. Journalist Andrew Lawler joins us to talk about the lost colony and how it has become part of American myth.

RadioWest divider.

Thursday, we’re talking about the lost colony of Roanoke. In 1590, some 100 English settlers vanished from present-day North Carolina with little trace. It’s a story that has captured the imagination of Americans, with theories as vastly different as peaceful coexist with indigenous tribes to alien abduction. In a new book, journalist Andrew Lawler looks for traces of the colonists with historians and archaeologists and explores how the story of Roanoke has become part of the myth of America.

Andrew Lawler is a journalist who writes about archaeology, history, and science for publications like  National Geographic, SmithsonianThe New York Times and more. He's the author of Why Did the Chicken Cross the World and his new book The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke [Indie bookstores|Amazon|Audible]

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
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