RadioWest

Fridays from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

A show for the wildly curious. Doug Fabrizio explores the world through in-depth conversations with writers, filmmakers, scientists, thinkers and others. From KUER in Salt Lake City.

Vibrator Rx

May 7, 2012
From New York's "The Syracuse Herald," 1919

In 1978, technology historian Rachel Maines was researching needlework when she came across ads for vibrators in 19th century magazines. They were sold as medical treatment for women with "hysteria." Symptoms were depression, irritability, confusion and more. Maines' research is the basis of a play on stage in Salt Lake and a Hollywood film that opens here next month. Tuesday, we'll talk to Maines about the history of the vibrator and what it can still tell us about women's roles in society.

The Guardian Poplar

May 4, 2012
KUED Channel 7

When former University of Utah President Chase Peterson began writing his memoir, it was largely to displace panic after a cancer diagnosis. He says his book is not the story of an academician, a scientist or a physician, though Dr. Peterson is all of those things. It's what he calls a "human and spiritual journey," that took him from the American West to New England and home again. Monday, Chase Peterson talks with us about the people he has served and the moments that brought his life meaning.

God's Jury

May 3, 2012
Edward Sorel's illustration from the cover of God's Jury

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition. But not everybody really knows what it is, either. The writer Cullen Murphy has written a book about the Catholic Church's 700-year persecution of its enemies, both real and imagined. And he says the "inquisitorial impulse" lives on - in America's massive surveillance and routine use of torture in the wake of 9/11, for example. Murphy joins Doug on Friday to remind us the Inquisition isn't something safely relegated to the past (Rebroadcast)

From "Bully"

Thursday, we’re joined by Lee Hirsch, director of the troubling and powerful film “Bully.” It’s the latest in our Through the Lens documentary series. Hirsch has said he wanted to bring the hidden lives of young people who are bullied out in the open. He spent a year following five families – including two trying to find some resolution after their sons took their own lives. We’ll talk to Hirsch about the film and present free screenings at 4:35 and 7:10 at the Broadway Centre Cinemas.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/merydith/5882357227/">Will Merydith</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Wednesday, farming and gardening experts, young and old, join Doug to help ring in the 2012 growing season. Local farming guru Fred Montague and ecologist Gary Paul Nabhan will discuss soil health – because good food starts with good soil – and the increasing need for small, local gardens to help counteract the ill side effects of industrial food production. Then we’ll switch gears to explore the rise of America’s new crop of farmers who are adapting old techniques to fit their new agricultural ethos.

Frank Sinatra called Spencer Tracy “The Gray Fox.” Some actors called him “The Pope.” The biographer James Curtis calls Tracy the greatest actor of his generation. Through the years, Tracy’s legacy has faded, eclipsed by that of Katharine Hepburn, one of his great loves. Curtis has written a biography of Tracy that refurbishes his story, detailing his relationship with his wife, Louise, his love affair with Hepburn, his drinking problem and his inimitable acting chops. Curtis joins Doug on Tuesday.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/raychelnbits/4187745579/">Raychel Medez</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

For those trying to make sense of dysfunction in US politics, historian Nancy Cohen has an answer: sex. Cohen argues that a 40-year backlash against the sexual revolution is at the heart of our current political wars, and she’s not just blaming Republican men. She says that Democrats are complicit and that women have been ardent champions of what she calls the counterrevolution. Monday, she’ll take us through the modern history of gender politics and explain what it means for the 2012 election.

Revelations

Apr 26, 2012
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/scotiamade/5114890900/ ">Wry&Ginger</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

For many, The Book of Revelation lays out a terrifying vision for the end of days: war, famine and plague visited on the Earth. Religion scholar Elaine Pagels says that with its symbolic language, the Bible’s final book has been subject to a range of interpretations though. She says it’s about hope as much as fear. Pagels’ latest book is called “Revelations” and Friday she joins us to explain what ancient prophecies can teach us not just about good and evil, but about humankind as a whole.

Scott Winterton | Deseret News

Thursday on RadioWest we're hosting a panel discussion about Utah's recent political caucuses. There's evidence that caucus delegates were more moderate this time around, and that they value experience more than in years past. That may explain why Sen. Orrin Hatch survived the caucus, only to face his first primary since 1976. We'll also talk about the coming congressional race between Rep. Jim Matheson and Republican nominee Mia Love, and what Democrats are doing to woo Utah's Mormon voters. 

Friday, Doug is joined by storyteller and humorist Kevin Kling. Kling is perhaps best known for his commentaries on NPR. His stories are autobiographical - funny, but deeply personal. Kling shares everything from holidays in Minnesota and performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia to living with a birth defect and surviving a near fatal motor cycle accident. He joins Doug to talk about the power of story to overcome tragedy. (Rebroadcast)

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