Renee Bright / KUER

If it feels like a slog to get to the gym and hit the weights, the reason may be much deeper than laziness — it could be evolution asking you to stay home.

Renee Bright / KUER

We know that racism is dangerous to a healthy society — physically dangerous, morally dangerous and also, Heather McGhee argues, economically dangerous for everyone in the country.

Last week, the New York Times published an article about the LDS Church’s sacred temple garments and the physical distress many women in the faith say they experience because of them.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Journalist and author George Packer is one of the country’s most astute observers of American society – with all of its flaws. But after years of reporting on our decline, Packer experienced a new feeling while writing his latest book: hope.

claffra / iStock.com

Earlier this spring, Oakley joined the nearby town of Henefer in banning some new construction out of concerns about available water. It’s an usual step for our growing state, but as historic drought continues to grip the West, these are the kinds of hard decisions our region is facing.

Kelsie Moore / KUER

One of Utah’s many oddities is its state bird: the California Gull. But did you know that the humble gull is the hero in its own miracle tale?

Blink O'fanaye / Flickr Creative Commons

In May, a Public Religion Research Institute survey found that nearly one in five members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints believes in QAnon — placing them just about in the middle of the Christian denominations polled. 

Renee Bright / KUER

We can probably all picture the stereotype of cult members: glassy-eyed, dressed alike, fixated on their leader. And then we might feel smug, because we’re nothing like them. Right?

Renee Bright / KUER

For years, folk singer Johnny Flynn and nature writer Robert Macfarlane admired each other’s work from afar. When they became friends, the two creators combined their talents to make an album together.

BRIANA JACKSON / ISTOCK

Real estate across the country has never been a hotter commodity. A couple years ago, there were already more potential homebuyers than there were available homes. But then the COVID pandemic hit, causing a greater housing demand coupled with a shortage of lumber and construction labor.

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