Curiousities

Culture, ideas and society.

Asking For A Friend

Sep 14, 2018
Woman reading newspaper.
Diego Sevilla Ruiz, CC via Flickr, https://bit.ly/2trHWEI

Friday, we're talking about what advice columnists have had to say over the years about life and love. Author Jessica Weisberg says our questions are the same, it’s the answers that have changed.

The psychologist Alison Gopnik worries that parenting is too much like being a carpenter, where you shape chosen materials into a final product. But what if we parented more like gardeners—creating nurturing spaces in which children can flourish?

New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb writes about the problems we have in this country with race and injustice. He says that race may just be a mythology, but it’s also a useful way of looking at our checkered history, and talking about it isn’t easy.

Office building with sign The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Elaine Clark / KUER

How should people outside of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints respond to the request to dump nicknames like Mormon or LDS? How are you thinking about it?

Dopesick

Aug 27, 2018
160 mg tablets of oxycontin from Purdue Pharma
Opiate Addiction Treatment via Flickr

What does it mean to be dopesick? When you're addicted and have run out of pills, it means misery and desperation. Journalist Beth Macy joins us with chilling stories from America's opioid crisis.

Far From The Tree

Aug 24, 2018
Nick Kenrick via CC/Flickr

In his book Far From the Tree, the writer Andrew Solomon tells the stories of children whose profound differences—dwarfism, schizophrenia, Down syndrome, genius, and others—have made them the subjects of prejudice and changed their parents’ lives.

In A Day's Work

Aug 23, 2018
Women of color in maid and other service uniforms.
From Cover/The New Press

Thursday, we’re talking about sexual violence against undocumented laborers. Journalist Bernice Yeung joins Andrew Becker to explain their struggle for justice in the age of the #metoo movement.

Everything Is Alive

Aug 22, 2018
PRX/Radiotopia

Have you ever wondered how inanimate objects feel? Radio producer Ian Chillag's new podcast puts actors in the roles of everyday objects, like a can of off-brand cola. It's silly, yes, but it's full of very real, very human feelings.

Writer and adventurer Craig Childs’s latest book is a unique kind of travelogue. It’s about his journeys across the country and back in time to the Ice Age to learn what life was like for the first people to arrive in North America.

istock

Robert Sutton is a Professor of Organizational Behavior at Stanford, and his book is a how-to for dealing with the jerks in your life. He says there’s really one word that fits them though: a--holes.

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