Sundance Film Festival

Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Director Brian Knappenberger’s Sundance documentary short Church and the Fourth Estate tells one man’s story–and the efforts to cover it up and silence him–of sexual abuse at the hands of his Scout leader when he was in middle school. 

Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Deep in the Arizona desert, there’s an enormous glass terrarium that houses a replica, in miniature, of the earth’s ecosystems. It’s called Biosphere 2.

Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Through the 1980s to the early 2000s, astrologer and TV personality Walter Mercado was a household name in Latinx homes–reaching, at his peak, an estimated 120 million people with his daily horoscopes. Then, in 2007, Mercado disappeared.

Courtesy of Sundance Institute

On Feb. 13, 2017, as he was walking through Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur International Airport, two young women approached North Korean royal family member Kim Jong-nam, smearing what proved to be VX nerve agent on his face. Within an hour, he was dead.

7th Empire Media

MIT researcher Joy Buolamwini was working with a facial recognition software when she encountered a problem: The robot she was programming could not detect her own face, and she had to wear a white mask in order to finish the project.

Courtesy of Sundance Institute

 

In the 2020 Sundance documentary Us Kids, director Kim A. Snyder chronicles how a group of high school students got thousands of young people all over the country talking about the impact of gun violence, and even made activism cool.

Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Friday, a harrowing look at how America cares for those suffering serious mental illness. Director Ken Rosenberg’s film Bedlam follows several mentally ill patients as they bounce in and out of healthcare, housing, homelessness and prison.

Even people who don’t like jazz know about Miles Davis. Director Stanley Nelson’s latest film profiles the mercurial musician whose relentlessly creative life gave birth to the word “cool.”

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In her film ALWAYS IN SEASON, director Jacqueline Olive investigates a modern-day lynching, and she explores where that story intersects with America’s appalling history of racial violence against African-Americans.

Tuesday, we continue our coverage of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival with Don Argott’s documentary film about Mormon rock ‘n roll star Dan Reynolds and his efforts to find some kind of middle ground between his church and the LGBT community.