Friday's Show

The Rise of Addictive Technology

Marketing professor Adam Alter begins his new book by noting that Steve Jobs didn’t let his own children use an iPad, a product he invented, because he was worried they’d get addicted to it. That’s what Alter’s book is about: our increasing addiction to technology. These days, we aren’t just hooked on substances, like drugs and alcohol. We’re addicted to video games, social media, porn, email, and lots more. Alter joins us to explore the business and psychology of irresistible technologies. (Rebroadcast)

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Beethoven's Ninth

Sep 8, 2011

This Friday and Saturday, the Utah Symphony will perform an Beethoven Ninth Symphony under the direction of Maestro Thierry Fischer. We're taking the opportunity to rebroadcast our conversation on the story behind the most famous piece of classical music in Western culture. Our guest is the Harvard professor Thomas Forrest Kelly - who says that to appreciate the Ninth Symphony, you have to hear it the way audiences did when it was first performed in Vienna, in 1824.  (Rebroadcast)

Packing for Mars

Sep 7, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/dotpolka/86705778/">dotpolka</a>/<a href=" http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Popular science writer Mary Roach says that when planning a space mission, everything that's taken for granted on Earth has to be "rethought, relearned and rehearsed." After all, flying a flag with no wind or managing to urinate in zero gravity is no easy feat. Roach's latest book is called "Packing for Mars," and she joins Doug for a look at space exploration and what it teaches us about being human. (Rebroadcast)

Tuesday on RadioWest the historian Will Bagley is with us to talk about his epic quest to chronicle the westward migration of American settlers. Bagley's book tells the story of the Overland Trails that brought more than half a million Americans to the far West of Oregon and California. It's the story of families and fortune hunters and the effect that all of it had the native people who for centuries had already been calling the West home. (Rebroadcast)

Farm City

Sep 5, 2011

Monday, we're talking about urban farming with the writer Novella Carpenter. Carpenter sometimes hears from people that they're moving to the country to farm. She said the problem is you get great food, but you don't have anyone to share it with. Carpenter wanted to farm and stay in her community - a very urban neighborhood in Oakland, California. Novella Carpenter joins Doug to talk about her book "Farm City." (Rebroadcast)

Painter Douglas Snow

Sep 1, 2011
V. Douglas Snow, Cockscomb Near Teasdale, 1985, courtesy the Springville Museum of Art collection, 1989.069

Most of us know the paintings of the artist Douglas Snow through his public installations - at the airport and the lobby of the Pioneer Theatre. His pieces are often shocking when you first come upon them and they prompt a strong reaction. That reaction must have delighted Snow, who never created his works to simply blend in. Doug Snow died in 2009 and a retrospective of his work has just opened in Salt Lake City. Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with him about his connection to place. (Rebroadcast)

Utah's Timpanogos Storytelling Festival is this weekend, and Thursday, Doug is joined by featured performer Kevin Kling. Kling is a humorist, perhaps best known for his commentaries on NPR. His stories are autobiographical - funny, but deeply personal. Kling shares everything from holidays in Minnesota and performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia to living with a birth defect and surviving a near fatal motor cycle accident. He joins Doug to talk about the power in story to overcome tragedy.

Prisoner of Zion

Aug 31, 2011
Qala-i-Jangi, Afghanistan. Photo by Scott Carrier

Wednesday, Doug is joined by independent radio producer Scott Carrier. When the US invaded Afghanistan after the attacks on 9/11, Carrier decided to go there too. He wanted to meet the enemy himself and find out what life is like in their world. But when he returned, he also found an enemy at home. It was the fear and anger that he says Americans have towards others. Scott Carrier has just published a book of stories from the post-9/11 world. It's called "Prisoner of Zion."

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/42931449@N07/5299199423/">photosteve101</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

There's been a lot of talk since the economy stumbled about how to get it back on track. Should the government cut taxes or spend money to get things flowing again? This debate isn't new; it's been raging since the Great Depression, when economists Friedrich Hayek and John Maynard Keynes developed theories that get to the heart of this fundamental question. Tuesday, we're talking about supply-side and demand-side economics and asking what each approach could do to make a difference today.

Courtesy <a href="http://www.seis.utah.edu/lqthreat/perseq.shtml" target="_blank">University of Utah Seismograph Stations</a>

There's geologic evidence of 6.5 and greater earthquakes violently shaking our region. Seismologists say it will happen again in Utah, though it's difficult to say when. We do know that there could be devastating consequences for the urban landscape. As the saying goes, "Earthquakes don't kill people, buildings do." Thursday, we're talking about what scientists are learning about earthquakes, what one would mean for the Wasatch Front and what is being done to prepare our community. (Rebroadcast)

How Pleasure Works

Aug 26, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/albx79/2568081951/">Alberto Colombo</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Friday on RadioWest, the psychologist Paul Bloom joins Doug to explain how pleasure works. This is more than just about the simple pleasures of food or sex. How do you account for the pleasure of seeing a painting, for example, or for some, the pleasure of getting spanked? Pleasure is complicated, and Bloom says it's grounded in a belief about the essence of a thing. It's a conversation about philosophy, neuroscience, evolution, childhood development ... about why we desire what we desire. (Rebroadcast)

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Through the Lens Free Screening

Street Fighting Men

Join us for a free screening of Utah-based filmmaker Andrew James's documentary STREET FIGHTING MEN. It's a poignant examination of economic inequality's devastating impact on the black working class.

Monday's Show

Public domain

The Life and Legacy of Richard Nixon

“Few came so far, so fast, and so alone,” writes John Farrell in a new biography of President Richard Nixon. Nixon was an idealistic dreamer when he returned from World War II, and he quickly scaled the political ladder. After winning the presidency in 1969, he and his staff pursued progressive reforms and opened relations with China. But Nixon, says Farrell, had another, darker legacy: a divided and polarized America. Farrell joins us Monday to discuss Richard Nixon and the world he made. (Rebroadcast)

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Short Film

Unruly Things

Mushrooms are the perfect symbol for Ardean Watts' philosophy of life … a love of unruly things. Watts died July 21 at the age of 89. We had the chance to go on a walk with him in 2015.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

From the Archive

RadioWest and the Bard

Are you a fan of Shakespeare? We have to confess that we are too. Here's a collection of some of our conversations about the Bard.

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1