Wednesday's Show

Two 19th-century women holding each other intimately
Wild Nights with Emily

Through The Lens: Wild Nights With Emily

After the show today you might just ditch everything you thought you knew about the poet Emily Dickinson. Filmmaker Madeleine Olnek’s new film tries to correct the idea a lot of us have of Dickinson as a sullen, distant recluse.

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RadioWest | Films

Meet Margaret Dalglish ... a bad-a pioneer woman.

7/26/11: Annoying

Jul 26, 2011

In ANNOYING: The Science of What Bugs Us. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca and Flora Lichtman, multimedia editor for NPR's Science Friday, go on a scientific quest through psychology, evolutionary biology, anthropology, and other disciplines to uncover the truth about being annoyed. Tuesday they join Doug to discuss what it is that makes the perfect recipe for being annoyed.

Utah Legends

Jul 25, 2011
Salt Lake City's <a href="http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM1CD1">Lone Cedar Tree Monument</a>

With lost mines and the Three Nephites, grieving Indian maidens and a lake monster - Utah is full of legends. Whether they can be proven true or not, they're great stories and they teach us a lot about who we are. Monday, Doug talks to folklorist David Stanley and historian Will Bagley. From Bryce Canyon to Bear Lake, we'll talk about the state's best loved stories. (Rebroadcast)

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (kuer) - Journalist Christopher McDougall points out that there is only one other animal on the planet that wears shoes, and that's just because we "grab them by the legs and hammer them on." McDougall is the author of "Born to Run" and his book is at the center of the barefoot running trend. Wednesday, he joins us to explain why so many people are ditching their sneakers and reconnecting with the way he says our bodies were built to run. (Rebroadcast)

7/22/11: Richard III

Jul 22, 2011
Photo by Karl Hugh / Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2011

Friday, we're broadcasting from Cedar City, where Utah Shakespeare Festival is celebrating it's 50th anniversary. We'll talk to Artistic Directors Brian Vaughn and David Ivers about their vision for the Festival. We'll also explore Shakespeare's complicated character Richard III and ask how he measures against the history's assessment of the last Plantagenet king.

Photo by Karl Hugh. / Copyright Utah Shakespeare Festival 2011

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (kuer) - Thursday on RadioWest, we're live from the Utah Shakespeare Festival in Cedar City. The festival is of course known for performing the works of the bard, but they also stage contemporary plays. This year, the season includes Tennessee Williams' 1944 classic The Glass Menagerie. 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of Williams' birth, and we're taking the opportunity to talk about his life, his plays and his enduring characters.

State of Delaware Digital Archives

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (kuer) - Criminologist and former cop Peter Moskos says America's prisons are broken, overcrowded, unsafe places that rehabilitate no one and impose tremendous personal, social and economic costs. So he suggests a radical alternative: flogging. On Tuesday, Moskos joins Jennifer Napier-Pearce to argue why corporal punishment is a more humane option for justice.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/adisetiawan/2332993278/">Adi Setiawan</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Even as society contemplates the dangers of video games, neuroscientists and psychologists are using virtual reality therapy to treat a whole host of conditions. From post-traumatic stress disorder to burn treatment to stroke, researchers and practitioners are finding that virtual reality can ease pain, both physical and psychological. On Friday, Jennifer Napier-Pearce explores how therapeutic simulations are empowering both doctors and patients.

When 20-year-old Everett Ruess vanished in the Utah desert in 1934, he left behind a mystery that has puzzled historians and adventurers ever since. In 2009, writer David Roberts made headlines when he announced he had found Ruess' body while on assignment for National Geographic Adventure. Further DNA tests disproved the theory though and Ruess was lost again. Roberts has written a new book and he joins us to talk about the Everett Ruess he did find in the young man's writing, art and legend.

<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/anitakhart/3677724838/">Anita Hart</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

Tuesday, we're talking about Bach's Cello Suites and the incredible story of how musician Pablo Casals discovered the almost-unknown compositions in a second-hand store. Our guest is the journalist Eric Siblin, a one-time pop music critic who was "struck by musical lightening" when he first heard the Suites in concert. Siblin set out to write a history of The Suites and soon discovered three centuries of politics, intrigue and passion.

7/11/11: Cool Comfort

Jul 11, 2011
<i>Image by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/frippy/498537556/">Jessica Park</a>/<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en" target="_blank">Creative Commons</a> via flickr</i>

The temperature is starting to climb and if you haven't already, chances are good you'll be turning on your air conditioner soon. Besides making us more comfortable, that blast of cool air is also responsible for much of the way we live our lives. Air conditioning changed the way we work, the way we commute, even the way we interact with our neighbors. Monday, we're talking about the history of air conditioning and about how environmental and energy issues are changing the way we keep our cool.

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Live On Stage

Realities of Diversity: Maria Hinojosa

Join us on Wednesday, October 17 for a conversation with Maria Hinojosa, host of NPR's Latino USA. She's made it her mission to give a voice in the media to immigrants and minorities.

Thursday's Show

vote here sign
Shannon McGee via CC/Flickr, https://goo.gl/qj9ci1

Beyond Candidates: 2018 Ballot Measures

Utah voters have some important decisions to make this November. From medical marijuana, to Medicaid expansion and a referendum on gerrymandering, it’s a lot to consider. A panel of journalists joins us to discuss what’s at stake.

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On Topic

On Topic: Medical Marijuana

RadioWest and KUER News have been covering the debate around medical marijuana and Utah Proposition 2. Follow us as you prepare to vote in November.

Utah Profiles

Conversations with passionate and thoughtful people that make Utah unique.

LDS Topics

Conversations on LDS faith, history and culture

About RadioWest

Listen weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. MT on KUER 90.1