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Lynching and Spectacle

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Between 1880 and 1940, more than 4,000 African Americas were lynched in the U.S. And Scholar Amy Wood says they were mostly committed in public, with huge crowds celebrating with photos and souvenirs. 

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Between 1880 and 1940, more than 4,000 African Americans were lynched in the U.S. And to add to the atrocities of the murders, historian Amy Wood says they were mostly committed in public, with huge crowds celebrating with photos and souvenirs. Wood wanted to understand how it was that ordinary people came to commit acts of such extraordinary violence. She joins us Monday to talk about the history of lynching in America and what it says about fear, vengeance, and political terror.

Amy Wood is a professor of history at Illinois State University and the author of Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1880-1940 [Indie bookstores|Amazon]

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Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.