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Chosen Country

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Scott Carrier, homebrave.com
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On the road from Burns, Oregon, to the Malhuer National Wildlife Refuge in the winter of 2016.

When Ammon Bundy led an armed takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in 2016, writer James Pogue found himself there among the occupiers. He sensed that something big was happening, and it had less to do with public lands than with a political reckoning.

RadioWest divider.

  

When Ammon Bundy led an armed takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in 2016, writer James Pogue found himself there among the occupiers, admitted into their inner circle. He’d fly-fished, reported, and bar-hopped his way throughout the West, and he couldn’t shake the sense that something big was happening here, but it had less to do with public lands than with a political reckoning. Pogue joins us to talk about his time at the Malheur occupation and the underpinnings of a righteous rebellion. (Rebroadcast)

James Pogue's writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York TimesVice, among others. His new book is called Chosen Country [Indie bookstores|Amazon].

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
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