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It seems like everyday you hear about a new do-it-all fitness regimen or a new study showing that the exercises that you once thought were best are actually bad for you. In our 21st Century Fitness series, we consult the brightest minds to try to cut through the fat and find out what it really takes to be fit and healthy today.

Aging and Exercise

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Paul Holbrook
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Somewhere around our late 30s or early 40s, our bodies begin to breakdown. We lose muscle mass, flexibility, strength and power. We typically chalk it all up to just getting old, but a growing body of research shows that inactivity is largely to blame. Researchers are also finding that the effects of aging can be drastically reduced by training a lot like an athlete would. Tuesday we’re talking about aging and exercise. We’ll be joined by a physical trainer and a researcher who argue that to age gracefully we should age actively.

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Training specialist Paul Holbrook likes to compare the benefits of interval training by comparing two athletes. Both these sprinters are the same age. The one above is a sprinter; a marathoner below.

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GUESTS

  • Dr. Joseph Signorile is a professor of exercise physiology in the Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences at the University of Miami (Florida). He's also the author of the book Bending the Aging Cur​ve [Amazon/Indiebound]
  • Paul Holbrook is a certified personal trainer with a master's degree in gerontology. He's the founder of the gym Age Performance in Salt Lake City, which trains adults aged 50 and over
Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.