wildly curious
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper

3-10_robert_bryce_crop.jpg

The conservative author and researcher Robert Bryce says the debate over climate change is a hyper-partisan slugfest. So when he talks about our energy future, he starts with this question: if we agree that too much carbon dioxide is bad for the Earth and for us, what do we do about it? In his latest book, Bryce says it’s not less consumption or alternative fuels that will save us. Bryce is in Utah and joins us to explain why he says entrepreneurship and innovation are the way to save ourselves and our world.

Robert Bryce is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, a conservative think tank in New York. He's the author of five books including Power Hungry: The Myths of "Green" Energy and the Real Fuels of the Future [Indiebound|Amazon] and his most recent Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper: How Innovation Keeps Proving the Catastrophists Wrong [Amazon|Indiebound]

Robert Bryce is in town as a guest of the Energy & Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah. Wednesday, March 11 at 7:00 p.m., he'll speak at the Salt Lake City Public Library as part of EGI's "Bridging Science and Politics" series. His lecture is Scale, Shale & the Myths of "Green" Energy. [details] [map]

Doug Fabrizio has been reporting for KUER News since 1987, and became News Director in 1993. In 2001, he became host and executive producer of KUER's RadioWest, a one hour conversation/call-in show on KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City. He has gained a reputation for his thoughtful style. He has interviewed everyone from Isabel Allende to the Dalai Lama, and from Madeleine Albright to Desmond Tutu. His interview skills landed him a spot as a guest host of the national NPR program, "Talk of the Nation." He has won numerous awards for his reporting and for his work with RadioWest and KUED's Utah NOW from such organizations as the Society of Professional Journalists, the Utah Broadcasters Association, the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.